the contextual life

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Season’s Greetings from Literary New York

with 3 comments

2011 has been a great year for New York area booknerds. There are a number of thriving independent bookstores in Manhattan and Brooklyn, each with their own personality, staffed by fun, passionate readers who truly enjoy engaging with customers.

Anyone who takes a quick glance at my events page knows that during any given week there are a number of incredible author readings and launch parties vying for one’s attention. It’s a constant struggle to decide to how spend the night. There are series highlighting independent presses, literary journal parties, and authors in conversation with journalists, editors, and agents.

What follows here are the voices of just a few of the many, many hardworking people in the local community who have made this year unimaginably enjoyable and intellectually stimulating. Looking forward to the upcoming holidays, they’ve each thought of someone they’d gift a book to, said what that book would be and why; and then, because book people are impossible to buy books for, they’ve mentioned something book related they would like to get.

I hope you check out their bios and see what each of them are up to. Even if you don’t live in the area, I know that in this age of social media, you’ll benefit from their tireless creativity. Thanks to all of them and so many others.

And now, in no particular order (except for in which they were received):

Mark Asch is an editor at The L Magazine, in Brooklyn. You can follow them on Twitter at @TheLMagazine.

Who would you buy a book for? What would it be and why?
I would like to buy my 17-year-old self Jane Eyre, which I finally read this year; whenever I get around to belatedly loving a received classic I start to resent myself and my education for not getting it into my life sooner, which seems unhealthy but there you go.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
Accessorize it! with: wooden wine crates, which are great to fill with the books that start piling up on your floor once you run out of shelf space.

*****

Ron Hogan helped create the literary Internet by launching Beatrice.com in 1995. He is the author of Getting Right with Tao and The Stewardess Is Flying the Plane, and has contributed to several anthologies, including the New York Times bestseller Not Quite What I Was Planning, Forgotten Borough: Writers Come to Terms with Queens, and Secrets of the Lost Symbol. You can find him on Twitter at @RonHogan

Who would you buy a book for?
I think books are a perfect gift for just about anybody, once you know them well enough to have some idea of what they already have.

What book would it be? Why?
This year, I’ve been eyeballing Ruhlman’s Twenty, the new cookbook from Michael Ruhlman, as a potential gift for at least two or three foodies on my holiday list. Heck, I’ve been considering letting people know I might want it.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
I could really go for an Eames Lounge and Ottoman set, which would instantly become my default reading environment, but at nearly $4,000 BEFORE sales tax, I’m not holding my breath.

*****

Erica Barmash is the senior marketing manager at Harper Perennial. You can find her on twitter @ericabrooke and @HarperPerennial. She loves presents.

Who would you buy a book for?
My fiance, Tom

What would it be?
The Meatball Shop Cookbook

Why?
Last year for Valentine’s Day I gave Tom the Clinton St. Baking Company Cookbook, and he proceeded to make me chili, huevos rancheros, and grits that are just as good as the ones at the restaurant. I love The Meatball Shop and so does he, and I’m hoping we can repeat that pattern. His meatballs are already amazing, but with this book he’ll be able to experiment.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
Finally, Out of Print Tees has made a v-neck tee for a book I love! I want this A Tree Grows in Brooklyn shirt

******

Max Fenton is online editor of the Believer magazine and runs community support for Readability.com. You can find him on Twitter at @maxfenton

Who would you buy a book for?
My smarter, more damaged friends.

What book would it be?
The Instructions” by Adam Levin

Why?
A fifth-grader may or may not be the messiah and definitely falls in love. At 1050 pages the comparisons to Infinite Jest are apt, but Levin succeeds on his own merits with this intense and remarkable novel.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
A better desk lamp. I learned in October that peripheral vision affects the degree of eyestrain when screen reading, so the tone of light around your screen should be about the same as the screen itself.

******

Jenn Northington is the the events manager for WORD, a bookstore in Brooklyn, co-founder of the Bookrageous podcast, and haunts the interwebs as jennIRL. You can find her on Twitter at @jennIRL

Who would you buy a book for?
I have a lot of nerdy friends (SURPRISE). They’re often hard to buy for, because they each inhabit a very particular nerd niche — some are more into sci-fi, some fantasy, some pop-culture, and you never know what they have and what they don’t. Tricky!

What book would it be?
If there’s one book that I want to give all of them this year it’s How to Speak Wookiee: A Manual for Intergalactic Communication.

Why?
Sound-bytes from Chewie, side by side with hilarious (and possibly inaccurate) translations (I mean, I don’t think they actually visit an art gallery to talk about postmodernism in the original trilogy at least, but I could be wrong) — you really cannot go wrong.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
I’m so glad you asked — I’ve been salivating over Moleskine’s USB Rechargeable Booklight. The design is gorgeous, as you might expect, and the use of an LED light is just ingenious.

******

Tobias Carroll lives and writes in Brooklyn, New York. His fiction has appeared in Joyland, THE2NDHAND, Metazen, Word Riot, and more. He can be found online at www.thescowl.org, and contributes regularly to Vol. 1 Brooklyn. You can find him on Twitter at @TobiasCarroll

Who would you buy a book for?
That friend or family member who appreciates both well-written fiction and a good political debate.

What book would it be?
The double feature of Vanessa Veselka’s Zazen and Justin Taylor’s The Gospel of Anarchy. Because, hey: why buy one book when you could buy two?

Why?
Veselka and Taylor each grapple with complex interpersonal relationships, examine esoteric left-of-center movements, and ultimately leave their readers — whether sympathetic or hostile to said movements — challenged. But the novels also contrast in distinctive ways. The Gospel of Anarchy is set in a very specific place, with roots in the Gainesville punk scene of a few years ago. Zazen‘s setting is an unnammed city in the very near future (or, alternately, in a slightly more nerve-wracking present). Taylor’s tone moves from the grittily realistic to the mystical; Veselka’s, from the satirical to the paranoid. And both are terrific novels that stay in your head long after you’ve turned the last page.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
Some sort of logic-defying bookshelves that can fit twice as many books as the ones currently in my apartment. We’re only a few years from the bold defiance of spatial laws in the name of bibliophilia, right?

******

Michele Filgate is Events Coordinator at McNally Jackson Books, and a freelance writer and critic. You can find her on Twitter: @readandbreathe

Who would you buy a book for?
My grandmother Mimo. One of my favorite stories to tell is how she was fired from her first job when she was a teenager because she was caught behind the clothing racks reading a book. Mimo was the person who turned me into a voracious reader. We used to go to the library sales and buy bags of books.

What book would it be?
I’m buying her a signed copy of A CHRISTMAS BLIZZARD by Garrison Keillor.

Why?
She’s a big fan and was excited to hear that he was signing at McNally Jackson.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
I REALLY want someone to buy me an Ideal Bookshelf painting by Jane Mount. I just found out about this artist via Emma Straub, and I think it’s the perfect gift!

******

David Gutowski is the writer behind the music and literature blog Largehearted Boy. He also hosts a monthly music and author reading series at WORD in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. You can follow him on Twitter at @largeheartedboy.

Who would you buy a book for?
The young or old fan of supernatural commercial fiction.

What book would it be?
Martin Millar’s Lonely Werewolf Girl and Curse of the Wolf Girl.

Why?
Martin Millar transcends the supernatural genre with his smart writing; multiple, credible plotlines; well-drawn characters; and healthy doses of pop culture references.

These supernatural novels will appeal to both adult and young adult readers, and just might be the perfect opportunity to sneak something literary into the reading of Twilight fans.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
A gift certificate to my local indie bookstore.

*****

Penina Roth is the curator of the Franklin Park Reading Series in Crown Heights, Brooklyn and a freelance journalist. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, the New York Post, the Forward and other publications. You can find her on Twitter at @PeninaRoth

Who would you buy a book for? What would it be and why?
I’d like to give my pulp romance-reading friend – let’s call her Susie – a copy of Simon Van Booy’s latest novel, Everything Beautiful Began After (in fact, it’s sitting on a shelf in my living room but I keep forgetting to drop it off). I’d like to steer her away from Danielle Steele and Nora Roberts and into more literary reading material, and I think Van Booy’s lush and tender novel, with its gorgeous language and imagery, would appeal to her. The romantic triangle subject doesn’t interest me (I avoid love stories), but I appreciate how Van Booy uses Athens, a complex city of bustling streets and crumbling ruins, as a lens for his rootless protagonists’ shifting moods. The characters cycle through loneliness, love and heartbreak amidst stray dogs, menacing shadows, pink sunsets, gleaming white buildings and broken statues. And the striking language makes mundane life sound exotic: a flight attendant is described as “a mechanical swan, wrapped in blue cotton” and a small French village is seen as “an open mouth of crooked houses.”

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
As far as book accessories, I’d be happy with a compact reading lamp that won’t fall off my tiny nightstand.

Who would you buy a book for? What would it be and why? And what book-related accessory would you like to get? Comments are open.

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Written by Gabrielle

December 15, 2011 at 6:01 am

3 Responses

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  1. […] A number of literary New Yorkers, including one Vol.1 editor, suggest some gift ideas for the weeks to come. […]

  2. […] I wrote about Vanessa Veselka’s Zazen and Justin Taylor’s The Gospel of Anarchy for The Contextual Life’s seasonal gift guide, which I urge you to check out. Short version: they’re two novels that feel deeply relevant in […]

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