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New in Paperback for March

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Keep your eye out for these paperbacks coming out this month.

Made to Break by D. Foy
Two days before New Years, a pack of five friends–three men and two women–head to a remote cabin near Lake Tahoe to celebrate the holidays. They’ve been buddies forever, banded together by scrapes and squalor, their relationships defined by these wild times.

After a car accident leaves one friend sick and dying, and severe weather traps them at the cabin, there is nowhere to go, forcing them to finally and ultimately take stock and confront their past transgressions, considering what they mean to one another and to themselves.

With some of the most luminous and purple prose flexed in recent memory, D. Foy is an incendiary new voice and “Made to Break,” a grand, episodic debut, redolent of the stark conscience of Denis Johnson and the spellbinding vision of Roberto Bolano.

Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture by Daniel Mendelsohn
Waiting for the BarbariansOver the past decade and a half, Daniel Mendelsohn’s reviews for The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review have earned him a reputation as “one of the greatest critics of our time” (Poets & Writers). In Waiting for the Barbarians, he brings together twenty-four of his recent essays—each one glinting with “verve and sparkle,” “acumen and passion”—on a wide range of subjects, from Avatar to the poems of Arthur Rimbaud, from our inexhaustible fascination with the Titanic to Susan Sontag’s Journals. Trained as a classicist, author of two internationally best-selling memoirs, Mendelsohn moves easily from penetrating considerations of the ways in which the classics continue to make themselves felt in contemporary life and letters (Greek myth in the Spider-Man musical, Anne Carson’s translations of Sappho) to trenchant takes on pop spectacles—none more explosively controversial than his dissection of Mad Men.

The Story of My Purity by By Francesco Pacifico; translated by Stephen Twilley  
Thirty years old, growing flabby in a sexless marriage, Piero Rosini has decided to dedicate his life to Jesus. He’s renounced the novels and American music that were filling his head with bullshit; he’s moved out of his fancy bourgeois neighborhood, which was keeping him from finding spiritual purity and the Lord’s truth. Now that he and his wife have settled into an unfinished housing development on the far outskirts of Rome, he’ll be able to really concentrate on his job at an ultraconservative Catholic publishing house, editing books that highlight the decadence and degradation of modern society, including one claiming that Pope John Paul II was secretly Jewish. But Piero is suffocating. He worries that The Jewish Pope might be taking things too far. He can’t get his beautiful sister-in-law out of his head. Temptations are breaking down his religious resolve. He decides to flee to Paris, which turns out not to be the best way of guarding his purity.

With a charismatic narrator as familiar with the finer points of Christian theology as with the floor layout of IKEA and the schedules of European budget airlines, Francesco Pacifico’s exuberant novel brings us Europe old and new and the inner workings of a conflicted but always compelling mind. The Story of My Purity is fiction with great humor, intelligence, neuroticism, and vision, from a young writer at the beginning of a tremendous career.

Present Shock by Douglas Rushkoff
People spent the twentieth century obsessed with the future. We created technologies that would help connect us faster, gather news, map the planet, and compile knowledge. We strove for an instantaneous network where time and space could be compressed.

Well, the future’s arrived. We live in a continuous now enabled by Twitter, email, and a so-called real-time technological shift. Yet this “now” is an elusive goal that we can never quite reach. And the dissonance between our digital selves and our analog bodies has thrown us into a new state of anxiety: present shock.

Douglas Rushkoff weaves together seemingly disparate events and trends into a rich, nuanced portrait of how life in the eternal present has affected our biology, behavior, politics, and culture.

The Unchangeable Spots of Leopards by Kristopher Jansma
As early as he can remember, the narrator of this remarkable novel has wanted to become a writer. From the jazz clubs of Manhattan to the villages of Sri Lanka, Kristopher Jansma’s hopelessly unreliable—yet hopelessly earnest—narrator will be haunted by the success of his greatest friend and literary rival, the brilliant Julian McGann, and endlessly enamored with Evelyn, the green-eyed girl who got away. A profound exploration of the nature of truth and storytelling, this delightful picaresque tale heralds Jansma as a bold, new American voice.

Drunk Tank Pink: And Other Unexpected Forces That Shape How We Think, Feel, and Behave by Adam Alter
Most of us go through life believing that we are in control of the choices we make—that we think and behave almost independently from the world around us. But as Drunk Tank Pink illustrates, the truth is our environment shapes our thoughts and actions in myriad ways without our permission or even our knowledge. Armed with surprising data and endlessly fascinating examples, Adam Alter addresses the subtle but substantial ways in which outside forces influence us—such as color’s influence on mood, our bias in favor of names with which we identify, and how sunny days can induce optimism as well as aggression. Drunk Tank Pink proves that the truth behind our feelings and actions goes much deeper than the choices we take for granted every day.

Sailor Twain by Mark Siegel
Sailor TwainOne hundred years ago. On the foggy Hudson River, a riverboat captain rescues an injured mermaid from the waters of the busiest port in the United States. A wildly popular—and notoriously reclusive—author makes a public debut. A French nobleman seeks a remedy for a curse. As three lives twine together and race to an unexpected collision, the mystery of the Mermaid of the Hudson deepens. A mysterious and beguiling love story with elements of Poe, Twain, Hemingway, and Greek mythology, drawn in moody black-and-white charcoal, this new paperback edition of the New York Times Best-Selling graphic novel by author/illustrator Mark Siegel is a study in romance, atmosphere, and suspense. Don’t miss Sailor Twain.

Written by Gabrielle

March 4, 2014 at 6:51 am

Favorite Podcasts of 2013

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headphonesMy good buddy David over at Largehearted Boy every year rounds up year-end lists featuring books and music. On his suggestion, here’s my list of the podcasts I couldn’t stop listening to.

By the Way with Jeff Garlin
Possibly the best find of the year has been By the Way, Jeff Garlin’s new podcast. Recorded live at Largo in Los Angeles, Garlin sits down with his talented friends to discuss all sorts of things. Garlin’s laugh alone makes this one infectious but the conversations will keep you coming back. If you’ve not been listening to it, your 2013 has been a wash.

Longform Podcast
Longform journalism has been making some noise lately and, along with Longreads, the site Longform has done much to propel it into the public consciousness. What might not be as known is that they have a weekly podcast where they interview journalists about their work. The conversations range from particular stories the writer has worked on to how they make ends meet between jobs. I look forward to it every week.

Other People
Just over the 200 episode mark and still going strong, Other People, hosted by Brad Listi, is one of the best author interview podcasts out there. Not content with a simple conversation about the writer’s latest book, Brad delves into childhood memories, the writing process, and anything unique to his guest’s experience that they’re willing to discuss.

Book Riot
Literary website Book Riot started a podcast this year and it quickly became one of my favorites. Every weekend I look forward to the bookish banter of co-founder Jeff O’Neal and Senior Editor Rebecca Schinsky. Together they parse out the week’s publishing and literary news, discuss the latest book gadgets, and go over the week’s new releases. Always fresh. A must-listen.

Late Night Library
If you’re reading this site, there’s a good chance you can never hear enough about publishing. Late Night Library is an organization based in Portland dedicated to promoting book culture, especially the indie sort. On their podcast Late Night Conversation, along with writers they interview industry people about their various positions and how it works within the chain of events, manuscript to bookstore.

Pop Culture Happy Hour
Hosted by NPR editors, producers, and critics, Pop Culture Happy Hour is a casual conversation about the week’s pop culture news. The chemistry of the co-hosts, their familiarity with each other, is most-endearing. Perfect way to kick off the weekend.

Design Matters
I became aware of Debbie Millman after Maria Popova highlighted her book, Brand Thinking, a collection of interviews with design and advertising creatives. A look into these minds was fascinating, in large part due to Millman’s knowledge of the industry and her subjects. On Design Matters, a podcast hosted by Design Observer, Millman brings her impeccable research and optimism to the conversation.

Slate
I don’t think it’s a stretch to say that Slate has perfected the podcast. Duration, format, everything. They’ve nailed it. While there are four main shows — the Political Gabfest, the Culture Gabfest, the Double X, and for all you sports fans, Hang Up and Listen, hosted by Stefan Fatsis, Josh Levin, and Mike Pesca — they continue to explore themed series. There’s Lexicon Valley, which discusses language, the monthly Audio Book Club, and, most recently, Mom and Dad are Fighting, a frank and honest look at parenting.

Gweek
The popular site Boing Boing has a number of podcasts on their roster. One of my favorites is Gweek, a show where editor Mark Frauenfelder and friends bring authors, artists, and other creative types on to discuss their work. Some recent shows include interviews with Clive Thompson for his book on the Internet, book designer Chip Kidd, and Wired magazine founding editor Kevin Kelly.

Six Pixels of Separation
If you’re the least bit interested in where business and creativity meet, Mitch Joel’s interviews are a goldmine.

Also recommended:
Stuff You Should Know
Recommended if You Like
Next Market (a podcast about podcasting)

Written by Gabrielle

December 24, 2013 at 7:11 am

New in Paperback for December

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Here are just a few paperback releases coming out this month that have caught my eye.

Black Is the Color by Julia Gfrorer
Black is the ColorBlack is the Color begins with a 17th-century sailor abandoned at sea by his shipmates, and as it progresses he endures, and eventually succumbs to, both his lingering death sentence and the advances of a cruel and amorous mermaid. The narrative also explores the experiences of the loved ones he leaves behind, on his ship and at home on land, as well as of the mermaids who jadedly witness his destruction. At the heart of the story lie the dubious value of maintaining dignity to the detriment of intimacy, and the erotic potential of the worst-case scenario. Julie Gfrorer’s delicate drawing style perfectly complements the period era of Black is the Color, bringing the lyricism and romanticism of Gfrorer’s prose to the fore. Black is the Color is a book as seductive as the sirens it depicts.

To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others by Daniel Pink
To Sell is HumanTo Sell Is Human offers a fresh look at the art and science of selling. As he did in Drive and A Whole New Mind, Daniel H. Pink draws on a rich trove of social science for his counterintuitive insights. He reveals the new ABCs of moving others (it’s no longer “Always Be Closing”), explains why extraverts don’t make the best salespeople, and shows how giving people an “off-ramp” for their actions can matter more than actually changing their minds.

Along the way, Pink describes the six successors to the elevator pitch, the three rules for understanding another’s perspective, the five frames that can make your message clearer and more persuasive, and much more. The result is a perceptive and practical book–one that will change how you see the world and transform what you do at work, at school, and at home.

Hip Hop Family Tree by Ed Piskor
Hip Hop Family TreeThe lore of the early days of hip hop has become the stuff of myth, so what better way to document this fascinating, epic true story than in another great American mythological medium — the comic book? From exciting young talent and self-proclaimed hip hop nerd Ed Piskor, acclaimed for his hacker graphic novel Wizzywig, comes this explosively entertaining, encyclopedic history of the formative years of the music genre that changed global culture. Originally serialized on the hugely popular website Boing Boing, The Hip Hop Family Tree is now collected in a single volume cleverly presented and packaged in a style mimicking the Marvel comics of the same era. Piskor’s exuberant yet controlled cartooning takes you from the parks and rec rooms of the South Bronx to the night clubs, recording studios, and radio stations where the scene started to boom, capturing the flavor of late-1970s New York City in panels bursting with obsessively authentic detail. With a painstaking, vigorous and engaging Ken Burns meets- Stan Lee approach, the battles and rivalries, the technical innovations, the triumphs and failures are all thoroughly researched and lovingly depicted. plus the charismatic players behind the scenes like Russell Simmons, Sylvia Robinson and then-punker Rick Rubin. Piskor also traces graffiti master Fab 5 Freddy’s rise in the art world, and Debbie Harry, Keith Haring, The Clash, and other luminaries make cameos as the music and culture begin to penetrate downtown Manhattan and the mainstream at large. Like the acclaimed hip hop documentaries Style Wars and Scratch, The Hip Hop Family Tree is an exciting and essential cultural chronicle and a must for hip hop fans, pop-culture addicts, and anyone who wants to know how it went down back in the day.

The Question Concerning Technology, and Other Essays by Martin Heidegger
Question Concerning TechnologyThe advent of machine technology has given rise to some of the deepest problems of modern thought. Featuring the celebrated essay “The Question Concerning Technology,” this prescient volume contains Martin Heidegger’s groundbreaking investigation into the pervasive “enframing” character of our understanding of ourselves and the world. As relevant now as ever before, this collection is an essential landmark in the philosophy of science from “one of the most profound thinkers of the twentieth century” (New York Times).

The Guy Under the Sheets: The Unauthorized Autobiography by Chris Elliott
Chris ElliottIs Chris Elliott a highly successful and beloved comedian—or a slightly dim-witted notalent from a celebrity family who managed to convince a generation of disillusioned youth that he was funny? From a ghastly childhood on the posh Upper East Side to his first job entertaining mobsters with his Judy Garland impersonation, The Guy Under the Sheets is packed with countless episodes from the life of a mediocre artist who somehow faked his way to the top—of semi-moderate fame and fortune. Woven throughout thectional fun in Elliott’s memoir are wonderful real-life anecdotes that will delight many new readers and loyal fans alike.

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 by Trina Robbins
Pretty in InkWith the 1896 publication of Rose O’Neill’s comic strip The Old Subscriber Calls, in Truth Magazine, American women entered the field of comics, and they never left it. But, you might not know that reading most of the comics histories out there. Trina Robbins has spent the last thirty years recording the accomplishments of a century of women cartoonists, and Pretty in Ink is her ultimate book, a revised, updated and rewritten history of women cartoonists, with more color illustrations than ever before, and with some startling new discoveries (such as a Native American woman cartoonist from the 1940s who was also a Corporal in the women’s army, and the revelation that a cartoonist included in all of Robbins’s previous histories was a man ) In the pages of Pretty in Ink you’ll find new photos and correspondence from cartoonists Ethel Hays and Edwina Dumm, and the true story of Golden Age comic book star Lily Renee, as intriguing as the comics she drew. Although the comics profession was dominated by men, there were far more women working in the profession throughout the 20th century than other histories indicate, and they have flourished in the 21st. Robbins not only documents the increasing relevance of women throughout the 20th century, with mainstream creators such as Ramona Fradon and Dale Messick and alternative cartoonists such as Lynda Barry, Carol Tyler, and Phoebe Gloeckner, but the latest generation of women cartoonists–Megan Kelso, Cathy Malkasian, Linda Medley, and Lilli Carre, among many others. Robbins is the preeminent historian of women comic artists; forget her previous histories: Pretty in Ink is her most comprehensive volume to date.

Written by Gabrielle

December 4, 2013 at 7:00 am

Charlie Chaplin in New York

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Born in London in 1889, legendary comic actor Charlie Chaplin grew up poor. He was the son of a singer who often found herself out of work due to poor health. Together with his older brother, Sydney, he found ways to make ends meet by following in the family’s entertaining footsteps. The two Chaplins were successful both on stage and on screen, each signing million dollar contracts at some point in their career.

Charlie Chaplin’s autobiography, simply titled My Autobiography, recently published as part of Melville House’s Neversink Library series, is a fascinating life story. Not only is it a portrait of the film industry from the early 1920s to the 60s, it’s a look at how a mixture of luck, talent, and business savvy created one of the era’s top performers.

Around 1910, Chaplin landed in New York for the first time. Here is his first impression:

At ten o’clock on a Sunday morning we at last arrived in New York. When we got off the street-car at Times Square, it was somewhat of a let-down. Newspapers were blowing about the road and pavement, and Broadway looked seedy, like a slovenly woman just out of bed. …

However, this was New York, adventurous, bewildering, a little frightening. Paris, on the other hand, had been friendlier. Even though I could not speak the language, Paris had welcomed me on every street corner with its bistros and outside cafes. But New York was essentially a place of big business. The tall skyscrapers seemd ruthlessly arrogant and to care little for the convenience of ordinary people; even the saloon bars had no place for the customers to sit, only a long brass rail to rest a foot on, and the popular eating places, though clean and done in white marble, looked cold and clinical.

I took a back room in one of the brownstone houses off Forty-third Street, where the Times building now stands. It was dismal and dirty and made me homesick for London and our little flat. In the basement was a cleaning and pressing establishment and during the week the fetid odour of clothes being pressed and steam wafted up and added to my discomfort.

That first day I felt quite inadequate. It was an ordeal to go into a restaurant and order something because of my English accent — and the fact that I spoke slowly. So many spoke in a rapid, clipped way that I felt uncomfortable for fear I might stutter and waste their time.

I was alien to the slick tempo. In New York even the owner of the smallest enterprise acts with alacrity. The shoe-black flips his polishing rag with alacrity, the bartender serves beer with alacrity, sliding it up to you along the polished surface of the bar. The soda clerk, when serving egg malted milk, performs like a hopped-up juggler. In a fury of speed he snatches up a glass, attacking everything he puts into it, vanilla flavour, blob of ice cream, two spoonfuls of malt, a raw egg which he deposits with one crack, then adding milk, all of which he shakes in a container and delivers in less than a minute.

On the Avenue that first day many looked as I felt, lone and isolated; others swaggered along as though they owned the place. The behaviour of many people seemed dour and metallic as if to be agreeable or polite would prove a weakness. But in the evening as I walked along Broadway with the crowd dressed in their summer clothes, I became reassured. We had left England in the middle of a bitter cold September and arrived in New York in an Indian summer with a temperature of eighty degrees; and as I walked along Broadway it began to light up with myriads of coloured electric bulbs and sparkled like a brilliant jewel. And in the warm night my attitude changed and the meaning of America came to me: the tall skyscrapers, the brilliant, gay lights, the thrilling display of advertisements stirred me with hope and a sense of adventure. ‘That is it!’ I said to myself. ‘This is where I belong!’

Written by Gabrielle

November 20, 2013 at 7:20 am

Week in the News for November 11

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Here are this week’s interesting media and publishing stories. Add your favorites to the comments section.

Social Media

  • Daily Facebook activity among younger teens is in decline. AdWeek
  • Jenna Wortham wonders if Facebook is fading. Bits
  • Evan Williams, co-founder of Twitter, talks about his new venture, Medium. NYT

Media and Publishing

  • John Oliver leaves the Daily Show for HBO. AdWeek
  • BuzzFeed Books promises positive coverage. CJR
  • 10 technological innovations in TV broadcasting. Stuff of Genius

Lifehack and Business

Writing and Grammar

Podcasts

  • Marco Arment, creator of Instapaper and lead developer for Tumblr. NextMarket
  • Tim Stevens, Engadget’s former Editor-in-Chief. RIYL
  • Tech columnist David Pogue talks about leaving The New York Times for Yahoo! NextMarket

For fun

  • The experiment that led to the concept of “thinking outside the box.” io9
  • Do our brains find certain shapes more attractive than others? Smithsonian

Written by Gabrielle

November 17, 2013 at 11:39 am

Link roundup for the week of October 28

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Here are some of my favorite stories and news items from this week’s publishing, media, and tech reporting.

E-books, Readers, and Apps

Tech

  • Researchers and designers are proposing new keyboard layouts for thumb typing. The Atlantic
  • How to crack a Wi-Fi password (and protect your own) Lifehacker
  • You don’t have to leave your gadgets behind to get away from it all. GadgetLab

Social Media

  • Facebook dominates in logins; Google makes gains [infographic] SocialTimes
  • At 300 million users, Google+ activity remains in question. Digits
  • Is Facebook failing marketers? Digiday
  • Facebook is looking to develop better consumer tracking technology. WSJ
  • Has Twitter changed the role of the literary critic? NYTBR

Media and Publishing

  • World Book Night US announced their 2014 selections. WBN
  • Random House acquires Figment, an online writing community for young readers. Jacket Copy
  • Editor & Publisher’s 2013 EPPY Award winners. E&P

Writing and Grammar

  • Five best free online word processors. Mashable
  • How to polish your writing. Poynter
  • When to use the passive voice. CJR
  • Tim Kreider on writing for free. New York Times

Lifehack and Business

  • How anxiety leads decisions astray. HBR
  • Top 50 executives who make wheels turn.  AdWeek
  • The structure of a 60 second pitch. Fast Company
  • Tick is a new to-do app. Lifehacker
  • 7 apps for a faster commute. Mashable

Podcasts

  • Former editor at Esquire and GQ, now editorial director of nonfiction at Random House, Andy Ward. Longform

Misc.

  • The science of a great subway map. FastCoDesign
  • Best Longreads accounts on Twitter. Mashable
  • Paintlist, a new app by Dutch Boy, recommends paint colors based on songs. New York Times
  • New iPhone app Knoala is a repository for toddler playtime ideas. Techland

Written by Gabrielle

November 1, 2013 at 6:42 am

Link roundup for the week of October 21

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Lots of interesting media, tech, and publishing news this week. Here are just a few things that caught my eye.

E-books, Readers, and Apps

  • Competition in the tablet market is increasing. NYT
  • 97% of newsstand apps are now free. AdWeek
  • New moms spend more time on smartphones than other adults. LA Times
  • Using metrics to boost e-book sales. MediaShift

Social Media

  • Five tips for promoting your online events using social media. Social Times
  • Facebook rolls out a new feature to help publishers increase engagement. Facebook

Media and Publishing

Writing and Grammar

Lifehack and Business

Podcasts

Misc

  • Most popular coffee brands on Twitter [infographic] All Twitter
  • Abraham Lincoln liked infographics. Elements

Written by Gabrielle

October 25, 2013 at 6:46 am

Link Roundup for the Week of October 14

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TelegraphHere are just a few things in the media and publishing world that caught my eye this week. Add your favorites in the comments section.

E-books, Readers, and Apps

  • Oyster iPad app has arrived. GalleyCat
  • Judge appoints monitor to keep eye on Apple’s e-book business. CNET
  • Five useful apps. Aliza Sherman

Social Media

  • One year later, Medium is changing the way writers write and readers read. MediaShift
  • Video sharing site Upworthy pairs emotional content with catchy headlines to spread social awareness. New York Times
  • Online mentions: New York Times vs. Mashable [infographic] SocialTimes
  • Twitter revenue more than doubles in third quarter. Bloomberg
  • Does real-time marketing work? AdWeek

Media and Publishing

  • Debut ratings for MSNBC’s “Up Late with Alec Baldwin” TV Newser
  • Willa Paskin reviews “Up Late with Alec Baldwin” Slate
  • A look inside the life of New York City newspaper hawkers. CJR

Writing and Grammar

Lifehack and Business

  • Five prefixes to use in your email subject lines. 99u
  • Use your email autoresponder for maximum productivity. FastCompany

Podcasts

Misc

Written by Gabrielle

October 18, 2013 at 6:49 am

Link Roundup for the Week of October 7

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Here’s this week’s tech, media, and book publishing news.

E-books, Readers, and Apps

  • E-book singles are on the rise. AppNewser
  • McDonald’s is teaming up with UK publisher DK to distribute free e-books to diners. Forbes
  • Kindle Paperwhite reviewed. Wired

Tech

  • Young people are not as digitally native as many believe them to be. Bits
  • How to get better Internet connection in your hotel room. GadgetLab
  • Silicon Valley novels blur fiction and nonfiction. Bits

Social Media

Media and Publishing

Writing and Grammar

Lifehack and Business

  • Sourcing talent for the workplace of the future. Wired
  • Tame your Twitter feed by turning off retweets. GadgetLab
  • What multitasking does to your brain. FastCompany

Podcasts

Misc

  • A breakdown of Twitter’s 200+ million users (funny). Geek Culture
  • Edgar Allan Poe’s obituary. The Paris Review
  • “Doctor Who” fans petition to light the Empire State Building in Tardis blue. CNET
  • Geek vs. Nerd, this hip hop offers help with definitions. Social Times

Written by Gabrielle

October 11, 2013 at 6:47 am

Link roundup for the week of September 16

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Carnival BarkerHere’s this week’s roundup of publishing and tech news. Link to your favorite stories in the comments section.

E-books and Readers

  • Trade e-book sales growth continues to slow through first half of 2013. DBW
  • Digital publishing in the developing world differs from that in the US. Publishing Perspectives
  • The future of art e-books. The Guardian

Apps and Tech

  • Laura Miller beta tests Oyster, the forthcoming iOS e-book rental app. Salon
  • So does Ian Crouch. Page-Turner
  • Nearly two-thirds (63%) of cell phone owners now use their phone to go online. Poynter
  • TV producers are experimenting with second-screen viewing opportunities. DBW

Social Media

Media and Publishing

  • Next year Americans will be allowed to enter the Man Booker prize. Telegraph
  • Netflix looks to pirating sites to see what shows to buy. Telegraph
  • Nick Bilton on online piracy. Bits
  • A House judiciary subcommittee hearing on intellectual property and piracy is set for Wednesday. AdWeek
  • The New Yorker, redesigned. New York Times

Writing and Grammar

  • Is it possible to “transcend genre?” a debate. io9
  • 25 things you should know about worldbuilding. Chuck Wendig
  • Grammar Pop: a word game app. Grammar Girl

Lifehack and Business

  • Wharton puts first-year MBA courses online for free. Businessweek
  • Retailers say Gmail’s new filtering system harms e-mail marketing efforts. New York Times
  • Tim Harford on mastering the technology around you. Financial Times
  • The upside of a messy office. Well

Podcasts

  • Mitch Joel and Michael Hyatt talk about the importance of building a platform. Twist Image
  • The Slate Culture Gabfest answers listener’s questions, one on media consumption. Slate
  • Good e-Reader has a radio show. Good e-Reader

Misc.

  • Clive Thompson talks about the benefits of tech; Joshua Glenn talks about reviving old scifi novels. Gweek
  • Ray Dolby, inventor of the Dolby noise-reduction system and Dolby digital surround sound died. New York Times
  • So did Hiroshi Yamauchi, President of Nintendo since 1949. Wired
  • Brooklyn Book Festival party at Greenlight tonight. Greenlight

Written by Gabrielle

September 20, 2013 at 6:57 am

Link roundup for the week of September 9

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gossipLots of interesting publishing news and opinions this week. Share your favorite articles in the comments section.

E-books and Readers

  • 71% of travelers prefer to fly with printed books. Good E-Reader
  • Tablet sales will outpace PC sales for the first time in the final quarter of this year. Traditional PC companies are without a viable strategy. The Guardian
  • If you have an Android you can customize the font on your e-reading app. TeleRead
  • An all-digital library opened in Texas. Good E-Reader

Apps and Tech

  • Apple’s App Store is not affected by the Justice Department ruling on price-fixing. Businessweek
  • Oyster, Apple’s iPhone App, will offer all-you-can-read e-books for $9.99/mo. ZDNet
  • On Monday, the F.C.C. and Verizon went to court over Net Neutrality. The New York Times
  • Timeline of Net Neutrality. Public Knowledge
  • The Readmill app allows e-book owners to share marginalia. Damien Walter wonders about future copyright issues. The Guardian
  • Twitter to sell ads on mobile app. Bits

Social Media

  • Facebook’s new Page Insights will allow businesses to track social media engagement. Poynter
  • Social analytics platform Topsy has archived every tweet in existence. Here are 10 ways to use it as a publicity tool. PR Newser
  • Rachel Fershleiser is leading Tumblr’s new book club. GalleyCat
  • Successful real-time marketing campaigns. AdWeek
  • How publishers can get the most out of Facebook marketing. Publishing Perspectives
  • The perfect social media post for multiple platforms [infographic]. All Twitter

Media and Publishing

  • What publishers can learn from the music industry about subscription models. Music Industry Blog
  • NewsHour Weekend reviewed. CJR
  • Sponsored content is on the rise. Digiday
  • Percentage of time given to reporting vs. opinion at CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC. Poynter

Writing and Grammar

Lifehack and Business

  • Is there really such a thing as a ‘workaholic’?  The Atlantic
  • Five tips for better public speaking. 99u
  • A short tutorial on “Bullet Journal,” a new system for to-do lists. Co. Design

Podcasts

  • Cal Morgan spoke about publishing with Brad Listi. Other People
  • Alec Baldwin is getting his own show on MSNBC. Listen to his podcast Here’s the Thing. WNYC
  • What marketers need to know about Google+ Hangouts. Social Media Examiner
  • Mind and Machine, Part I. CBC Radio Ideas

Misc.

  • Emily Nussbaum on Pivot, a new TV channel for the Internet generation. New Yorker
  • “The purpose of multitasking had gone from supporting multiple users on one computer to supporting multiple desires within one person at the same time.” Elements
  • Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” video recreated with LEGOs. DesignTaxi

Written by Gabrielle

September 13, 2013 at 6:52 am

Link roundup for the week of September 2

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MegaphoneHere’s some of the publishing and book news that caught my attention this week. Link to your finds in the comments.

E-books and Readers

  • Amazon is launching KindleMatchbooks, a program that bundles print and e-books. It’s retroactive. Forbes
  • The history and future of color e-paper. Engadget
  • Cory Doctorow has some thoughts on libraries and e-books. Locus
  • Esquire is launching a weekly tablet edition to reach a younger audience. The Guardian
  • Tablet owner demographics 2013. Pew Internet
  • Nicholas Carr talks about the history of paper and how we read digitally. Nautilus Magazine

What we’re learning now is that reading is a bodily activity. We take in information the way we experience the world—as much with our sense of touch as with our sense of sight. Some scientists believe that our brain actually interprets written letters and words as physical objects—a reflection of the fact that our minds evolved to perceive things, not symbols.

Apps and Tech

  • Apps are on the rise, possibly because they match the way our brain works. Wired UK
  • Google just launched “Chrome Apps.” Techland
  • Clive Thompson on Google Glass New York Times Magazine
  • Farhad Manjoo heads to The Wall Street Journal to report on tech. Digits

Social Media

  • Heineken and Weiden + Kennedy New York devised a scavenger hunt using Instagram. Digiday
  • Twitter is preparing to go public. Bits
  • You might be tweeting your location. Huffington Post

Media and Publishing

Writing and Grammar

Lifehack and Business

  • Advice to freelancers for pitching stories. Useful for placing op-eds and articles. The Atlantic
  • Magazines are experimenting with various subscription models. People is the latest. AdWeek

Podcasts

  • BookRiot has a podcast. It’s good. BookRiot

Misc.

  • Rebecca Solnit on technology’s influence on time. London Review of Books
  • Joan Juliet Buck on interviewing Bashar al-Assad’s wife for Vogue. Newsweek
  • Frank Bruni on bringing your digital comforts with you while traveling. New York Times
  • Take the Ishihara Color Perception Test. io9

Written by Gabrielle

September 6, 2013 at 7:01 am

Link roundup for the week of August 26

with 4 comments

Breaking NewsHere are this week’s best links collected from my daily scouring of the Internet. Share your favorites in the comment section.

E-books and Readers

  • Kobo keeps pushing boundaries. Techland
  • Kobo will offer magazine service on their devices starting in October. Good Ereader
  • Does it make sense to bundle print and e-books? Publishing Perspectives
  • The Oxford English Dictionary is not for sale (in e-book) but you can rent it. The Guardian

Apps and Tech

  • The paradox of wearable technology: can devices augment our activities without ­distracting us? Technology Review
  • Three apps to help declutter your work and life. Aliza Sherman
  • Five apps to help you dress for fall. AppNewser

Social Media

  • J Crew put their catalog on Pinterest a day before it was available elsewhere. BusinessWeek
  • Twitter will allow retailers to sell products and services within tweets. Bloomberg
  • Shoppers are turning to YouTube for product research before buying. AdWeek
  • Alexis Madrigal deconstructs the new blogging platform Medium. The Atlantic
  • How to choose a hashtag for your campaign [infographic]. All Twitter
  • How to get your client’s content into Google’s new “In-Depth Articles” PR Newser

Media and Publishing

  • NewsHour at a crossroads. CJR
  • Al Jazeera America began broadcasting last week. Here’s how to measure their success. Poynter
  • Al Jazeera America’s launch ratings. TV Newser
  • Four journalist secrets every PR person should know. Cision
  • Slate launched an LGBTQ blog, Outward. June Thomas is heading up the effort. Slate

Writing and grammar

Lifehack and Business

  • Shut down your browser tabs by accident? If you’re using Chrome, here’s a keyboard shortcut for full recovery. Slate
  • 5 ways to perfect an author reading. Huffington Post
  • Four steps to creating a documented procedure for delegation. Michael Hyatt
  • Public speaking lessons learned from touring college campuses. Fast Company
  • Four things to do before the end of each work day. MediaJobsDaily
  • LinkedIn etiquette. Good.co

Podcasts

Misc.

  • 35 innovators under 35. Technology Review
  • Three bookstores got into a Twitter fight. BuzzFeed
  • 101 best writers, reporters, and thinkers on the Internet. Wired
  • Five websites for your photojournalism fix. CJR
  • Are tech firms the new pop culture villains? GigaOm
  • 20 online talks that will change your life. The Guardian

Written by Gabrielle

August 30, 2013 at 7:01 am

Brand Thinking with Debbie Millman

with 2 comments

Brand ThinkingThere’s a lot of talk about “brand” lately and, while I can’t claim this to be a new phenomenon, with the rise of social media the notion has extended beyond the walls of advertising and marketing meetings. Now that nearly everyone is on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and a host of other online forums, the term has come into public consciousness. People are asking how they want to present themselves to the world: what do I stand for? What should be public and what should remain private? What will build a reputation and what might destroy it? In essence, what is their “brand”?

There are many skeptics when it comes to branding. Those who view it negatively see it as insincere, disingenuous, and manipulative. But it doesn’t need to be this way. There’s a case for genuine marketing, a way of creating a strong, decided presence in order to connect with an eager audience.

I work in book publishing and constantly have to remind myself that not everyone knows what an imprint is: a subdivision of a larger publishing house. For example, Vintage is an imprint of Random House; Scribner, an imprint of Simon & Schuster; Riverhead, an imprint of Penguin; and St. Martin’s Press, an imprint of Macmillan.

For some who live within this bubble of publishing it can come as a surprise that not everyone looks at the spine of a book (where the name and logo of the imprint is located) when they walk into a bookstore; to us insiders it’s practically second nature. However, knowing what an imprint is and becoming familiar with what they publish can be incredibly useful to the general public.

Oftentimes you can tell the tone and quality of a book based on which imprint publishes it. If you’re looking for a business book, Crown and Portfolio are good bets; if you’re looking for something more literary Farrar, Straus and Giroux or Knopf might be the way you want to go; or if you are looking for something quirky in paperback, Harper Perennial, Three Rivers Press, and Plume will probably do the trick.

For those steeped in book culture these imprints are shorthand or, for those who like an air of exclusivity, secret code. It is this subsection of the book buying community that publishers—through social media and traditional advertising—can use branding to connect with and expand their audience.

What marketing naysayers might not know is that there are a number of professionals who are passionate about their branding projects, think deeply about their craft, and who don’t approach awareness-raising with cynicism.

In Brand Thinking and Other Noble Pursuits, Debbie Millman, partner and president of the design division at Sterling Brands, President Emeritus of AIGA, and chair of the School of Visual Arts’ master’s program in Branding, sits down with leading thinkers and designers in the field to get their thoughts on advertising. Throughout her interviews, Millman asks poignant and tailored questions. These unique conversations allow for a diverse range of definitions, anecdotes, and views of the industry.

In her introduction, Millman explains that “branding is a history in flux, and [her] hope is that this collection of conversations can provide a time capsule of the second decade of the 21st century.” Throughout Brand Thinking, humanity and storytelling are common themes; nearly everyone who creates campaigns has a desire to explore what brands are and what brand awareness means.

Debbie MillmanOne of the participants is Dori Turnstall, an Associate Professor of Design Anthropology, an area of study she explains has two components: the practical dimension, how to design products based on our understanding of people, and the theoretical, understanding how “the process and artifacts of design help define what it means to be human.”

From cultural critics Daniel Pink and Malcolm Gladwell to designer Karim Rashid to entrepreneur Seth Godin to a number of industry executives, Millman asks her subjects to explore the notion of “brand.” Each come to varying conclusions while sharing years of experience and knowledge.

Here are just a few excerpts from a book full of fascinating answers.

As mentioned, marketing expert Seth Godin was interviewed for the book. Here he defines brand:

I believe that ‘brand’ is a stand-in, a euphemism, a shortcut for a whole bunch of expectations, worldview connections, experiences, and promises that a product or service makes, and these allow us to work our way through a world that has thirty thousand brands that we have to make decisions about every day.

Wally Olins, Chairman of Saffron Brand Consultants of London, Madrid, Mumbai and New York, and author of a number of books on branding, has this to say about different mediums throughout the years (something to keep in mind as we’re flooding with information about the Internet and mobile devices):

Television didn’t kill radio; film didn’t kill theater. There will certainly be huge changes. But one medium doesn’t kill another. Each new medium actually makes the previous one better. Radio no longer resembles what it was before television. Television no longer resembles what it was before the Internet. All these things will change, but they give us a multiplicity of choice.

Anthropologist and author Grant McCracken, formerly a senior lecturer at the Harvard Business School and consultant for Coca-Cola, Chrysler, and Kraft, says this about understanding culture:

Designers—or indeed anybody who’s interested in business change or social change—need to make a knowledge of the culture and the social world in which they work the first condition of their provocation.

Regarding storytelling, former Chief Creative Officer of Ogilvy & Mather Brian Collins, who now runs his own communication and branding firm and whose clientele history includes Hershey’s, Coca-Cola, and Microsoft, says:

I think the secret to working with existing brands is to help them find their intrinsic story. And then amplify the stories for new generations to share. Brands have become the best device for perpetuating mythic archetypes. …

We say we want information, but we don’t experience the world through information—we experience the world through story. … Stories are how we give meaning to what happens to us. When we call upon them, they activate archetypes—”archetypes” as defined by Carl Jung. They remind us of eternal truths, and they help us navigate through our lives.

Stanley Hainsworth former VP of Global Creative at Starbucks and Former Creative Director of Nike says:

For me, it’s all about having a story to tell. This is what will enable you to create an experience around the brand. … You go back to the essence of the brand. Why was it made? What need did it fill? Go back to the origins of a brand and identify how it connected to consumers and how it became a relevant, “loved by families” product. What were the origins of this story?

And Cheryl Swanson, founder of brand consultancy Toniq says:

A brand is a product with a compelling story. … The brands are totems. They tell us stories about our place in culture—about where we are and where we’ve been. They also help us figure out where we’re going.

President of Innovation at Sterling Brands, DeeDee Gordon, discusses the need for the audience to feel like they’re a part of brand:

It’s not enough to produce great creative work. Consumers won’t automatically like an idea just because a brand says so. They need to be part of the creative process—a process that is fluid, organic, and on their own terms. A process like this produces the most useful insights and allows designers to think about products in a whole new way—oftentimes, they’re introduced to entirely new ideas. Consumers can be designer’s biggest advocates, but only if designers will let the conversation happen and give consumers the respect they deserve by allowing them to have a say.”

Whether you’re in an industry that sells books, food, clothing, or some other object with numerous competitors, Brand Thinking will start you on a path to exploring a way to differentiate yourself from the pack, one that’s light on cynicism and heavy on passionate belief.

When you’re finished reading, Debbie Millman hosts a podcast on Design Observer called “Design Matters” where she speaks with innovators and creatives in the design field in the same manner featured in Brand Thinking. These thoughtful and stimulating conversations are an excellent compliment to her books and will keep you tide over until the next one.

::[Links]::
Buy Brand Thinking from your local bookstore
Visit Debbie Millman’s website
Listen to Design Matters

Written by Gabrielle

July 23, 2013 at 7:00 am

Books to Work By: How to Win Friends and Influence People

with 2 comments

How to Win FriendsWorking in an office is a learned skill, even for those who are good with people—and even for those who work in a room full of friends. While general etiquette and being pleasant go a long way, it’s always worth seeing what can be fine tuned. However, doing so requires self-awareness and a willingness to change.

One classic in the self-help business genre—and an excellent place to start—is Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People. The cover of the “special anniversary edition” boasts that it’s the best book of its kind—and I’m not so sure they’re wrong.

How to Win Friends and Influence People is broken down into four parts: Fundamental Techniques in Handling People; Six Ways to Make People Like You; How to Win People to Your Way of Thinking; and Be a Leader: How to Change People Without Giving Offense or Arousing Resentment

Within each of these larger sections are smaller, more targeted chapters, each featuring anecdotes and quotes from important leaders’ lives as well as from Carnegie’s own personal experience—first as a salesman, then as a public speaker.

In the first chapter, “If You Want to Gather Honey, Don’t Kick Over the Beehive,” Carnegie sets the tone for the remaining 230 pages:

Do you know someone who you would like to change and regulate and improve? Good! That is fine. I am all in favor of it. But why not begin on yourself? From a purely selfish standpoint, that is a lot more profitable than trying to improve others—yes, and a lot less dangerous. ‘Don’t complain about the snow on your neighbor’s roof, ‘ said Confucius, ‘when your own doorstep is unclean.’

Carnegie is not stingy; forehead-slapping comments such as these are found on nearly every page. It’s these simple statements, these basic ways of being with others that we all learned in grammar school but forgot, that make How to Win Friends invaluable.

Quoting Henry Ford, Carnegie shares another important principle: “If there is any one secret of success, it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle as well as from your own.” And from Alfred Adler, a Viennese psychologist: “It is the individual who is not interested in his fellow men who has the greatest difficulties in life and provides the greatest injury to others.” And, of course, what advice book would be complete without Benjamin Franklin?: “If you argue and rankle and contradict, you may achieve a victory sometimes; but it will be an empty victory because you will never get your opponent’s good will.”

Each chapter ends with a distilled principle, reinforcing the lessons one should have learned from the previous pages: Give honest and sincere appreciation; Be a good listener; If you are wrong, admit it quickly and emphatically; Let the other person do a great deal of the talking; and, for those in a leadership position, make the fault seem easy to correct.

How to Win Friends and Influence People will make you think about your behavior, both within the office and without. Soon, you’ll find that those rough edges smoothed.

::[Link]::
Buy How to Win Friends and Influence People from your local bookstore

Written by Gabrielle

June 11, 2013 at 6:52 am

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