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What to Watch: Pariah

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It’s a commonly held belief that the African-American community is, when compared with the general population, less accepting of homosexuality at best and more homophobic at worst.

Recently, President Obama endorsed gay marriage and many wondered how black voters would respond in the upcoming election. However, on May 19th, in an outstanding display of solidarity with fellow human rights advocates, The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) passed a resolution in support of marriage equality, a move that is bound to chip away at this persistent stereotype.

Amidst this flurry of news, it’s suiting that “Pariah,” a film about a young, black lesbian, was just released on DVD.

In this full-length feature from director Dee Rees, Brooklyn high school junior Alike [Ah-LEE-kay], played by Adepero Oduye, navigates her way through family, friends, and love as her sexual orientation becomes increasingly obvious. Early in the film, the audience becomes aware of an inner tension living inside Alike. On the one hand she knows she’s gay, has no need to question it, and actively pursues women as she’s dragged along to gay clubs by her out friend, Laura. On the other is her family. Alike’s mother, played by Kim Wayans, a devoutly religious woman, attempts to steer her daughter toward a more feminine lifestyle through pink blouses and forced friendships. Although one gets the sense that her father, played by Charles Parnell, has the potential to be more accepting — he’s more lenient of Alike’s personal style — there’s a reluctance to confront her homosexuality head on.

For Alike, finding ground between these two worlds is a struggle. “It’s about her trying to find herself and express herself in a way that’s authentic,” said Rees in an interview with KCRW’s film show, The Treatment.

“Pariah” is a reminder to those who may have forgotten the details of high school life just how tumultuous and tortured those years can be. Part of Alike’s charm is how she hangs on with the best of them — getting straight As, leaning on her friend, using poetry as an emotional outlet, and finding a mentor in a supportive English teacher.

Much of “Pariah” is informed by Rees’s life, although it shouldn’t be confused with autobiography. The opening scene where Alike is in a gay club is inspired by Rees’s experience when she first came out — she even used the same song that was first playing when she’d walked in her first time. Although much of the film deviates from Rees’s personal story, “Pariah” has a very real feel to it: there are no gimmicks, no formulaic feel. “Pariah” is one of the most original films I’ve seen this year.

“This is a film about identity … it’s about how to be yourself. … It’s not the typical coming out story, it’s more coming into,” Rees said; and if viewers are open to it, they’ll find that the film transcends the immediate subject matter, giving it a universal coming-of-age feel.

“Pariah,” with its lovable lead character, is both heartbreaking and heartwarming. This realistic piece of cinema will leave you wondering: where is the next Dee Rees production?

::[Links]::
Pariah, the official website
Dee Rees interviewed on KCRW’s The Treatment
Dee Rees and lead actress Adepero Oduye speaks with NPR
Dee Rees profiled on The Root
An interview with the Los Angeles Times
NAACP announcement on marriage equality
Behind the NAACP Equality Decision at The Root

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Written by Gabrielle

June 12, 2012 at 7:00 am

On the Shelf: Recent Sights and Sounds

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Here are a few things that caught my eyes and ears these past few days.

Rub Out the Words: the Letters of William S Burroughs 1959-1974 ed by Bill Morgan

I’ve always found William Burroughs intriguing — after all, he did kill his common-law wife while playing a game of William Tell, or so the story goes. I read his novel Junky multiple times but could never get into Naked Lunch, the book he is best known for. Now, Ecco has published the second volume of his letters: correspondence that spans the years after the publication of Naked Lunch to the year he left London to return to New York.

Of the collection, The Telegraph writes:
“This second volume of correspondence may not quite dispel this image of Burroughs as American fiction’s resident alien, the lexical bomb-thrower in the body of a government man – but it does offer intriguing glimpses into the personality behind the mask. …

For fans of [his] way-out approach [the cut-up technique], the letters will provide a valuable glimpse into the genesis of his most impenetrable work, the trilogy that comprised The Soft Machine, The Ticket That Exploded and Nova Express. …

One surprising theme in these letters is Burroughs’s cosmic indifference to the swelling counterculture. Our correspondent remains unmoved as the Sixties progress, beatniks become hippies, and even the parties he attends in Hampstead start to be filled with people ‘turning on’.”

What’s the big idea?
Dostoevsky tackled free will, Tolstoy the meaning of life – but is it still possible to write philosophical novels?
by Jennie Erdal

This past weekend’s Financial Times had an incredible essay on philosophy, literature, and the blending of the two into the philosophical novel.

Jennie Erdal, the author of the essay, begins with philosophy and philosophers: “while [they] were good at asking questions and setting out arguments, their engagement with truth was often woefully abstract, and a world away from the stuff of novels”. She continues, “The analytical style [of philosophy] rigidly separated reason from imagination, precision from imprecision.”

Of novels, she writes, “The more I read at university, the more I felt that fiction was where truth was to be discovered” and that some things “can never be adequately expressed in conventional philosophical prose.” Erdal then makes a case for the hybrid form, “moral philosophy needs the novel for the fullest possible expression of its aims . . . Plato was wrong to think that literature had nothing to offer philosophy . . . It is one thing to study John Stuart Mill’s defence of utilitarianism in ethics; quite another to read the passage in Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment (1866), where Raskolnikov tests utilitarianism to its limits by taking an axe and cleaving an old lady’s head in two.”

It’s a brilliant read all the way through. For anyone interested in literary theory and the grander workings of fiction, this is not to be missed.

Orbital / Wonky
It can be scary picking up a new album by a band who has been around for 25 years — especially if that band, up until recently, has been on hiatus — but that’s exactly what’s going on with electronic duo Orbital who just released Wonky, their first album since 2004.

About their music, one half of the group, Paul Hartnoll, told Wired magazine, “Ultimately, it has to move us emotionally…. We can get a great big thunderous beat … but melody is the real icing on the cake for me. If I get a really good melody, I get really excited about thinking about what’s going to come. That’s when I burst into tears, thinking, ‘That’s it!’ The hook’s got you, and you know you’re going to finish that piece.”

Explaining why they’re back together and making music, he says “When you’ve got a background and a history, and a rich idea of what you wanted to do, it was a real shame to give up … It was the live aspect that I missed.”

The article features the video for ‘New France’. Here’s the video for ‘Wonky’. Not sure how I feel about the cats.

A Fantastic Fear of Everything
Simon Pegg’s new comedy, A Fantastic Fear of Everything, looks amazing. Unfortunately, at the time of this post, no US release date has been confirmed. Science fiction and fantasy site io9 quotes the synopsis:

“Jack is a children’s author turned crime novelist whose detailed research into the lives of Victorian serial killers has turned him into a paranoid wreck, persecuted by the irrational fear of being murdered. When Jack is thrown a life-line by his long-suffering agent and a mysterious Hollywood executive takes a sudden and inexplicable interest in his script, what should be his big break rapidly turns into his big breakdown, as Jack is forced to confront his worst demons; among them his love life, his laundry and the origin of all fear.”

They also have the trailer.

Podcasts
The first week in April, on the WTF podcast, Marc Maron spoke with musician and comedian Carrie Brownstein. Carrie was in the Olympia, Washington-based indie band Sleater-Kinney and is currently in Wild Flag; however, these days, she’s best known as co-creator of Portlandia, the sketch show on IFC. On the podcast, Marc and Carrie nerd out about music — and other things. One of my favorite WTFs so far.

On the Nerdist, voiceover actors Rob Paulsen and Maurice LaMarche taught me that voiceover actors are awesome. Rob and Maurice, which I only learned from this podcast, are the creators, and voices, of Pinky and the Brain. Their vocal skills do not end there. These two guys had Chris Hardwick awestruck. A must-listen.

What caught your eyes and ears these past few days? Comments are open.

Written by Gabrielle

April 10, 2012 at 7:03 am

What to Watch: Page One: Inside the New York Times

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If you’re looking for a take down of the New York Times, Page One: Inside the New York Times, is not for you. This documentary, which premiered at Sundance in January and is now available on DVD, is a look at the future of the newspaper industry through the lens of the New York Times’ media editors and reporters.

Director Andrew Rossi, previously the Associate Producer of Control Room, the 2004 documentary about Al Jazeera, had 14 months of considerable access at the Times. His footage even includes scenes from the twice-daily meetings where executives and desk editors meet to decide what stories would make it onto the front page, the coveted spot after which the movie is named.

When asked by The Huffington Post why he allowed Rossi such access, Bill Keller, who was the paper’s Executive Editor at the time of filming, said, “Andrew had what sounded like a smart angle — follow the media desk as it covers the implosion of our own industry”. More importantly, perhaps, “Andrew passed [David Carr’s] smell test.”

For those of you who don’t already who know David Carr is, you will by the end of the film. Former editor of the Twin Cities Reader and the Washington City Paper, now media columnist for the paper, David is the star of the film. He’s brash, incisive, scrappy—and incredibly likable. Despite his rough demeanor, he’s a fair journalist. In an interview with Fresh Air’s Terry Gross, Carr explains that he doesn’t trick sources into giving him good quotes. He doesn’t feed them false pleasantries hoping to lower their guard. If the story’s going to be a rough one, he tells them so they have a chance to defend themselves.

Carr’s media desk cohorts include Brian Stelter, a former anonymous blogger now Times reporter known for his fantastic Twitter skills, reporter Richard Perez-Pena, and department editor Bruce Headlam. Together, with a few other contributors, they form the site’s Media Decoder blog, which according the Times is “an insider’s guide to the media industry . . .  a showcase for the extensive media coverage throughout The New York Times and a window on how the business of connecting with consumers is changing in the digital age.”

The film sets out to chart the wave of uncertainty that swept the newspaper industry starting in 2008—and continues to this day. As part of the investigation into new media’s role in people’s consumption of news and the status of traditional news outlets, Wikileaks acts as a case study. As the paper who released the Pentagon Papers 30 years earlier, Times reporters and news analysts are able to make direct comparisons.

The film allows the editors at the paper to discuss the gaffes that had taken place in quick succession—the Judith Miller Iraq War reporting and the Jayson Blair plagiarism scandal—in their own words and how they affected traditional media’s integrity.

In a short segment on the encroaching online outlets both Gawker founder, Nick Denton, and Arianna Huffington, owner of The Huffington Post, said the future of the media is giving people what they want to read. Notable push back on this philosophy, one of hit-driven content, came from former Baltimore City reporter and Wire creator David Simon and Katrina vanden Heuval, Editor and Publisher of the liberal weekly magazine The Nation. ProPublica, an independent, non-profit investigative news outlet was praised for its model and efforts: serious reporting on issues that matter to the health of civil society and their willingness to partner with traditional media outlets for occasional content and distribution.

Also worth mentioning are the interviews with Clay Shirky, a prominent thinker on Internet technologies, and Jeff Jarvis, similarly, a media theorist, both of whom play something of a foil to the more positive predictions for traditional media outlets.

For media junkies, the talk about the future of print journalism, the behind-the-scenes footage, and David Carr’s show-stealing personality makes this documentary well-worth watching. Highly recommended for a lazy Sunday.

::[Links]::
Page One’s official website
Page One on Netflix
Q&A with Andrew Rossi
David Carr and Andrew Rossi on NPR’s Morning Edition
David Carr on Fresh Air
David Carr on Twitter
Brian Stelter on Twitter
Michael Kinsley’s review of the film for the New York Times
Slate’s review
Review on NPR’s All Things Considered

On the Shelf: books by people featured in the film

The Night of the Gun: A reporter investigates the darkest story of his life. His own. by David Carr
David Carr is outspoken about his history with drug addiction. He speaks a bit about it in the film. In this book.

“In his ambition for connection Mr. Carr decides to report on his own life as if That Guy were a stranger. If This Guy can’t clearly see That Guy through the chemical and temporal blur, perhaps others can. Across many months, equipped with tape recorder and video camera, he tracks down figures from his past: friends, antagonists (including old editors), drug dealers, former girlfriends, members of his immediate family. He even interviews his own daughters. He hopes all of them will fill in some of the blanks. For the most part they do. The emerging self-portrait is not pretty.” [Pete Hamill via New York Times]

You can listen to his 2008 interview on Fresh Air about the book and there’s a 3-minute video at the New York Times where he recounts an incident in the book.

Cognitive Surplus: How Technology Makes Consumers into Collaborators by Clay Shirky
“Shirky’s hypothesis is that a lot of the 20th century stuff we used to take for granted — most people didn’t want to create media, people didn’t value homemade and amateur productions, no one would pitch in to create something for others to enjoy unless they were being paid — weren’t immutable laws of nature, but accidents of history. The Internet has undone those accidents, by making it possible for more people to make and do cool stuff, especially together. . . . Cognitive Surplus fizzes with great insights about how people use networks and interact with each other [and] continues to prove that Clay Shirky is one of the best thinkers and advocates the net has. It’s a delight to read and will change how you think about the future.” [via BoingBoing]

You can check out his profile and videos at TED

Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way we Work and Live by Jeff Jarvis
“Privacy has its advocates. Jeff Jarvis has made himself an advocate for publicness. In Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way we Work and Live, the original Internet optimist argues that if we become too obsessed with guarding all personal information on the ‘Net, we’ll miss important opportunities that come with making information available.” [via Fortune at CNN Money]

You can listen to an interview with Jeff about his book on the Six Pixels of Separation podcast

The Kingdom and the Power: Behind the Scenes at The New York Times: The Institution That Influences the World by Gay Talese
Gay Talese, a former reporter for the Times, appeared in the film. He also wrote a book about the paper.

“The classic inside story of The New York Times, the most prestigious, and perhaps the most powerful, of all American newspapers. Bestselling author Talese lays bare the secret internal intrigues behind the tradition of front page exposes in a story as gripping as a work of fiction and as immediate as today’s headlines.” [IndieBound]

You can listen to an interview with Gay on NPR’s Talk of the Nation about his other book A Writer’s Life.

What’s on your shelf? Comments are open.

Written by Gabrielle

November 17, 2011 at 6:39 am

must see :: Bill Cunningham New York

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“Using the low-key approach that shapes Cunningham’s column, Press works up a portrait that’s as raw, gentle, funny, and—in the end—irresistible as the pictures themselves.” —Slate

If you don’t follow fashion you could be forgiven for not knowing who Bill Cunningham is. Forgiven—but not off the hook. There is even less of an excuse now that a fascinating documentary has been made about his life and work. In Bill Cunningham New York (Zeitgeist Films) Director Richard Press has captured a truly charming character who could have easily been overlooked by the wider public—and what a shame that would have been.

Although famously praised by Vogue’s Anna Wintour and given front row seating to all the fashion shows in the US and abroad, Bill, the legendary New York Times fashion photographer, is not one of these ascot-donning, private car-hiring types. Instead, this octogenarian can be seen riding his bicycle through New York City traffic in a blue smock normally worn by Parisian street cleaners—both of which point to his ascetic lifestyle beautifully captured on screen.

It might be easier to think of Bill not as a fashion photographer for one of the largest newspapers in the world, but as someone he more closely resembles: a street photographer. All day he roams the city looking for themes: hats, flowers, colors, patterns, whatever appears to be trending at the moment. His photos are candid and rarely, if ever, posed.

Every Sunday in the New York Times Style Section, Bill’s thematic photos are collected and carefully arranged. The painstaking process, also given time in the film, is both humorous and endearing. Aside from the shots of ordinary, and sometimes extraordinary, people, Bill is the man behind the week’s gala event pictures. One’s heart melts when you hear Bill explain that he chooses which to go to based on the good of the organization, not on who is attending as one would assume.

This sharp divide between the notion of the fashion industry and one of its most-loved is what makes this film so compelling to those outside of this seemingly glamorous culture. Bill Cunningham is one of the most genuine characters I’ve ever seen, a humanizing force in a world viewed as vapid and materialistic. All should be grateful to Press for taking the time to capture him on film.

After you watch this documentary, you’ll never miss the Sunday Style section again.

Official Trailer

Now playing at the IFC Center  and Village Cinema East through Thursday, June 16 and coming to Symphony Space starting June 12th

::[Links]::
Official site
Slate review
Bill Cunningham’s New York Times page

Written by Gabrielle

June 7, 2011 at 8:56 am

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