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Posts Tagged ‘on the shelf

Dispatches: Sharing Moments with SMITH Magazine

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SMITH Magazine is best known for its Six-Word Memoir project. In 2006, with the belief that everyone has a story to tell, Editor-in-Chief Larry Smith, Tim Barko, and Contributing Editor Rachel Fershleiser, came up with an online challenge: “Can you tell your life story in six words?”. This idea has since spawned six books and a robust online writing community.Interested in giving writers more space to flesh out their ideas, SMITH Magazine asked storytellers to write about a moment that changed their lives; and so, The Moment: Wild, Poignant, Life-Changing Stories from 125 Writers and Artists Famous & Obscure came to fruition.

Contributors, ranging in experience — some with multiple, award-winning and best-selling books to those who have never had a letter-to-the-editor published — sent in their personal stories. The Moment, going beyond the normal essay collection, features written narratives, photographs, comics, illustrations, and handwritten letters. Contributors include household names such as Jennifer Egan, Dave Eggers, Elizabeth Gilbert, and Gregory Maguire as well as up-and-coming writers such as Tao Lin and Said Sayrafiezadeh.

This week at McNally Jackson, contributors gathered to read their work to a standing-room only crowd. Kicking off the evening was experimental journalist A.J. Jacobs with his short story, “Chalk Face,” about the time he realized grown-ups are “not flawless authority figures”. Mira Ptacin, founder and executive director of the New York City-based monthly reading series and storytelling collective Freerange Nonfiction, read her story about the moment she, literally, hit the ground running and shook off the grief from the loss of an unexpected pregnancy.

There were visuals as well: a slideshow about the moment a father fell in love with his infant son, a video montage from photojournalist Gillian Laub about her grandparents’ inspiring relationship, Matt Dojny’s handwritten and illustrated story about his experience with a homeless man on the subway, and Jerry Ma’s comic panels about the time he quit his job in finance to pursue a life in art.

Now in its sixth year, SMITH Magazine continues to celebrate “the explosion of personal media and the personal stories that celebrate the brilliance in the ordinary”. Go on over and contribute your six-word memoir or, if you’re feeling particularly verbose, share your life-changing moment.

If you’re in New York and you missed this week’s reading, you have another chance to catch The Moment contributors at Greenlight Bookstore in Brooklyn on Thursday, January 26th.

What’s on the shelf:
The Moment: Wild, Poignant, Life-Changing Stories from 125 Writers and Artists Famous & Obscure
“ The Moment is a collection of and moving personal pieces about key instances – a moment of opportunity, serendipity, calamity, or chaos – that have had profound consequences on our lives.” [via website]

Six-Word Memoir collections
“When Hemingway famously wrote, “For Sale: baby shoes, never worn,” he proved that an entire story can be told using a half dozen words. When the online storytelling magazine SMITH asked readers to submit six-word memoirs, they proved a whole, real life can be told this way too. The results are fascinating, hilarious, shocking, and moving.” [via IndieBound]

And from the readers:

My Life as an Experiment: One Man’s Humble Quest to Improve Himself by Living as a Woman, Becoming George Washington, Telling No by A.J. Jacobs
“Bestselling author and human guinea pig A. J. Jacobs puts his life to the test and reports on the surprising and entertaining results. He goes undercover as a woman, lives by George Washington’s moral code, and impersonates a movie star. He practices “radical honesty,” brushes his teeth with the world’s most rational toothpaste, and outsources every part of his life to India—including reading bedtime stories to his kids.

And in a new adventure, Jacobs undergoes scientific testing to determine how he can put his wife through these and other life-altering experiments—one of which involves public nudity.
Filled with humor and wisdom, My Life as an Experiment will immerse you in eye-opening situations and change the way you think about the big issues of our time—from love and work to national politics and breakfast cereal.” [via IndieBound]

Secret Identities: The Asian American Superhero Anthology edited by Jerry Ma
This pioneering collection brings together 66 top Asian American writers, artists and comics professionals to create 26 original stories centered around Asian American superheroes – stories set in a shadow history of our country, from the opening of the West to the election of the first minority president, and exploring ordinary Asian American life from a decidedly extraordinary perspective.

Black Elephants: A Memoir by Karol Nielsen
“An aspiring writer and reporter, Karol Nielsen went trekking through the Peruvian Andes at the height of the Shining Path terror, looking for adventure and a good story. She found Aviv, an Israeli traveler fresh out of his mandatory military service—a war-weary veteran of the first intifada—dreaming about peace. Black Elephants follows this idealistic pair as they explore the Americas, until Aviv, inexorably drawn to his homeland, asks Karol to come with him to Israel. There, the couple’s lovingly laid plans—for Aviv to attend university, and for Karol to work on a kibbutz, study Hebrew, and get to know his family—are suddenly tested by the eruption of the first Gulf War. Nielsen’s memoir paints a poignant and harrowing picture of love during wartime. Against a backdrop of bursting bombs and air-raid sirens, gas masks and sealed rooms, relationships are frayed, and romance becomes a distant memory. This story, so candidly and clearly told, powerfully illustrates the terror, loneliness, and absurdity of war and its invisible casualties.” [via IndieBound]

Mary Elizabeth Williams is a staff writer for Salon. She’s written for The New York Times, Time Out, The New York Observer, and more, and is the author of “Gimme Shelter: My Three Years Searching for the American Dream.”

The Festival of Earthly Delights (forthcoming May 2012) by Matt Dojny
“The Festival of Earthly Delights is a humorous bildungsroman set in the fictional Southeast Asian country of Puchai. The protagonist, Boyd Darrow, has recently moved there with his unfaithful girlfriend to give their relationship a second chance. His adventures, and misadventures, are relayed in a series of letters to a mysterious recipient.” [via IndieBound]

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Written by Gabrielle

January 12, 2012 at 6:55 am

What to Watch: The Black Power Mixtape 1967 – 1975

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In the early 2000s, Swedish film director Göran Hugo Olsson was working on the documentary “Am I Black Enough for You” about 70s soul musician Billy Paul. While researching he found an archive of 16 mm tapes in the building of Swedish Television, the country’s broadcasting company. The footage had been shot by a group of Swedish television journalists sympathetic to the Civil Rights and Black Power movements in the US. In 1967 they’d traveled to America to document the lives of both ordinary black Americans as well as those politically involved in the struggle for equal rights.

This footage, nearly 85 hours of it, sat in a basement for 30 years. In the 70s, Olsson was a student in Sweden. It was a time when his generation developed an interest in the Vietnam War and America’s role in it. This was the time of author Stieg Larsson’s political activism, when he was a photo journalist working with revolutionary groups in the Horn of Africa. There was something in the air and the group of filmmakers had caught it. Years later, Olsson was, once again, inspired by it, which led him to create The Black Power Mixtape 1967 – 1975.

Deciding “to riff on the popular ‘70s ‘mixtape’ format,” Olsson was careful not to cut the footage into pieces. Instead he kept the interviews at length and assembled them in chronological order.

The first public figure we see is Stokely Carmichael, someone I’d never heard of before this film. Carmichael could be considered a bridge between Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Black Panthers. He started out as a leader of a nonviolent student organization, taking part in the 1961 Freedom Rides, a group that originally relied on civil disobedience. Soon, he’d lost patience with MLK’s message and found a new role model in Frantz Fanon. After reading Fanon’s seminal text, Wretched of the Earth, Carmichael took the organization in a radical direction, adopting instead, Black Power ideology.

Co-producer Danny Glover, whose production company helped secure funding for the film, when he saw the footage, was taken with how clearly it showed the link between the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. Highlighting this connections, and following the flow of history, the film moves naturally from Stokely’s words to those of the Black Panthers’.

There are echoes of Stokely in the footage that follows. Eldridge Cleaver, the Black Panthers’ Minister of Information, gives a speech about the presidential nominees in San Francisco in 1968, Bobby Seale, the Chairman, explains the all-encompassing nature of the organization, and Huey P. Newton, the Minister of Defense, in 1971, released on bail after his arrest on allegations of manslaughter, discusses the “abusive” and “oppressive” treatment he experienced while in jail.

For anyone familiar with Europe’s views of the American criminal justice system, it will come as no surprise that the Attica prison riot, fueled in part by the prisoners’ desire for better living conditions, and the murder trial involving Angela Davis, whose ancillary role as owner of guns used in a hostage situation, put her in the precarious position of defending her life.

Adding a contemporary component to the film is commentary from black thinkers today. Those featured in voice-overs are musicians Talib Kweli, Erykah Badu, and Questlove of The Roots. Throughout the film they, along with poets Sonia Sanchez and Abiodun Oyewole and academic Robin Kelley discuss their memories of and experiences with the figures and moments in the archival footage.

The Black Power Mixtape takes an often-unquestioning and sympathetic view of its subject. However, this fact is stated in the opening of the film with text on the screen: “It [The Black Power Mixtape] does not presume to tell the whole story of the Black Power Movement, but to show how it was perceived by some Swedish filmmakers.” While it shouldn’t be taken as a sole account of this time period, the film is both a fascinating and educational contribution to the documentation of American history. For anyone looking for a place to start — but not a place to end — The Black Power Mixtape 1967 – 1975 is a fantastic primer.

::[Links]::
Official Website
Watch Instant on Netflix (available for streaming at the time of this posting)
Stokely Carmichael’s essay “What We Want” (PDF)
Okay Player Interview with Film Director Goran Olsson

::[Dig Deeper]::
Malcolm X Speaks: Selected Speeches and Statements by Malcolm X
“These are the major speeches made by Malcolm X during the last tumultuous eight months of his life. In this short period of time, his vision for abolishing racial inequality in the United States underwent a vast transformation. Breaking from the Black Muslims, he moved away from the black militarism prevalent in his earlier years only to be shot down by an assassin’s bullet.” [via IndieBound]

Soul on Ice by Eldridge Cleaver
“By turns shocking and lyrical, unblinking and raw, the searingly honest memoirs of Eldridge Cleaver are a testament to his unique place in American history. Cleaver writes in Soul on Ice, “I’m perfectly aware that I’m in prison, that I’m a Negro, that I’ve been a rapist, and that I have a Higher Uneducation.” What Cleaver shows us, on the pages of this now classic autobiography, is how much he was a man.” [via IndieBound]

Revolutionary Suicide by Huey P. Newton
“Eloquently tracing the birth of a revolutionary, Huey P. Newton’s famous and oft-quoted autobiography is as much a manifesto as a portrait of the inner circle of America’s Black Panther Party. From Newton’s impoverished childhood on the streets of Oakland to his adolescence and struggles with the system, from his role in the Black Panthers to his solitary confinement in the Alameda County Jail, Revolutionary Suicide is smart, unrepentant, and thought-provoking in its portrayal of inspired radicalism.” [via IndieBound]

Are Prisons Obsolete? by Angela Davis
“With her characteristic brilliance, grace and radical audacity, Angela Y. Davis has put the case for the latest abolition movement in American life: the abolition of the prison. As she quite correctly notes, American life is replete with abolition movements, and when they were engaged in these struggles, their chances of success seemed almost unthinkable. For generations of Americans, the abolition of slavery was sheerest illusion. Similarly,the entrenched system of racial segregation seemed to last forever, and generations lived in the midst of the practice, with few predicting its passage from custom. The brutal, exploitative (dare one say lucrative?) convict-lease system that succeeded formal slavery reaped millions to southern jurisdictions (and untold miseries for tens of thousands of men, and women). Few predicted its passing from the American penal landscape. Davis expertly argues how social movements transformed these social, political and cultural institutions, and made such practices untenable.” [via IndieBound”

The Black Panthers Speak edited by Philip S. Foner
“For over three decades, The Black Panthers Speak has represented the most important single source of original material on the Black Panther Party. With cartoons, flyers, and articles by Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale, and Eldridge Cleaver, this collection endures as an essential part of civil-rights history.” [via IndieBound]

The Wretched of the Earth by Frantz Fanon
“The Wretched of the Earth (published 1961) is Frantz Fanon’s most famous work, written during and regarding the Algerian struggle for independence from colonial rule. As a psychiatrist, Fanon explored the psychological effect of colonization on the psyche of a nation as well as its broader implications for building a movement for decolonization.” [via Wikipedia] Jean Paul-Sartre’s preface.

Quality by Talib Kweli (2002)
“Talib’s elation here strikes as sophisticated, distinguishing itself from the materialistic acquisitions, drug binges and sexual conquests that pass for contentment on many hip-hop albums, with a spiritual center attained through an on-record intellectual honesty and emotional transparency that’s still rare in a culture that feeds off inflated stereotypes of machismo posturing and stands on the political platform of fatalism and resignation. In fact, Kweli’s unabashed positivity and emotional vulnerability feel almost transgressive to these ears. Even when he confronts the ills of society, as he does on the wrenching “Where Do We Go” and “Stand to the Side”, there’s a certain optimism and belief that by illuminating the darkness through hip-hop, we can hope to transcend the pain.” [via Pitchfork]

Written by Gabrielle

January 10, 2012 at 5:54 am

Dispatches: Talking DIY Culture at McNally Jackson

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Last night, McNally Jackson in SoHo hosted the panel (Re)making media: DIY, zines, punk rock, gen X and millenials in the digital age. The moderator Jacob Lewis, co-founder of a writing collective website for teens, Figment.com, was joined by Blake Nelson, whose book Dream School had been serialized and recently published by Figment, Christopher Bollen, whose book Lightning People was published by the indie press Soft Skull, Mikki Halpin, the creator of the now defunct zine Ben is Dead and the now defunct satirical website Shut Up Foodies, musician and writer Izzy Schappell-Spillman, Japanther’s Ian Vanek, and New York Times technology reporter, and recently the publisher and editor of Girl Crush Zine, Jenna Wortham.

Together, the group of panelists discussed DIY culture as it’s happening today and how technology is affecting the movement.

Most had a positive view regarding the rise of the Internet and its facilitation of independent productions. Izzy, who began her music career with the band Care Bears on Fire when she was just 8-years-old, and who is now 16, felt the online community has brought an end to isolation and has ushered in a time of quick creation. Jenna, who began as a culture blogger at the Times when she was 25, discussed that while it’s easy to get caught up in trying to be ahead of the news curve, especially when one is working for a media outlet, technology can have a profound effect on expressive culture. She mentioned Kickstarter, the online fundraising site where artists of all kinds can raise money for their projects, in particular. Blake Nelson serialized his first book, Girl, in Sassy and when he couldn’t find a publisher for the already-written sequel, Figment did the same by running it in pieces on their site.

The lone voice expressing opposition, mainly because he feels social media creates a culture of self-promotion and self-branding, was Ian Vanek. Although the most skeptical, his argument is solid: people today are too concerned with their public persona and not concerned enough with their actual art. For Vanek, he feels it’s “important to be invisible”.

A reminder of where DIY started, both Ian and Mikki spoke about the continued value of the printed zine. Online publishing platforms, with their endless opportunities for self-expression, are often corporately owned — and those companies ultimately have control over your content. The old-fashioned Xeroxed zine remains a way to share thoughts and ideas privately, or “sneakily,” as the panelists like to describe it.

Far from devolving into a trite debate about the pros and cons of the Internet, the discussion was a reminder that DIY, as an art form and ideology, is still very much a serious venture, regardless of the ease in which it can now be executed.

What’s on the shelf?

Here are just some of the projects and books created by the panelists:

Figment.com
Inspired by Japan’s cellphone novels, “Figment is a community where you can share your writing, connect with other readers, and discover new stories and authors. Whatever you’re into, from sonnets to mysteries, from sci-fi stories to cell phone novels, you can find it all here.” You can read a profile about Figment and its co-founder Jacob Lewis at The New York Times.

Girl by Blake Nelson
“Meet Andrea Marr, straight-A high school student, thrift-store addict, and princess of the downtown music scene. Andrea is about to experience her first love, first time, and first step outside the comfort zone of high school, with the help of indie rock band The Color Green.” [via IndieBound]

Dream School by Blake Nelson
“Imagining a typical ‘J. Crew/college catalogue’ experience, Andrea Marr leaves Portland to attend prestigious Wellington College in Connecticut. Surrounded by the best and the brightest, she works hard to adjust and keep up.” [via IndieBound]

Lightning People
“The fanciful premise behind the title of Bollen’s novel is that, after New York loses the lightning conductors of the Twin Towers, more and more residents die in lightning strikes. But the title also evokes the random nature of post-millennial city life, in which disaster or good fortune can strike at any time. An actor, supported by money from reruns of old commercials, pursues a sinister hobby—frequenting conspiracy-theory chat rooms and meetings. His wife doesn’t know about her husband’s fixation, distracted by her depressing job at the Bronx Zoo and her dysfunctional friends. Bollen excels at creating an atmosphere of Manhattan-specific dread, and certain scenes, particularly the account of a struggling actor’s going-away party, are tragicomic masterpieces.” [via The New Yorker]

Girl Crush Zine Edited by Jenna Wortham and Thessaly La Force
“For those unfamiliar, a girl crush is when a girl has such a deep admiration for another girl that it becomes an infatuation of sorts, though platonic in nature. Editors Jenna Wortham, a reporter for The New York Times, and Thessaly La Force, former blogger at The Paris Review, have taken this concept to the next level by celebrating girl crushes in an online and paper zine aptly called Girl Crush.” [via Laughing Squid]

Japanther
“Japanther have since made a name for themselves in unique performance situations. i.e. along side synchronized swimmers, a top the Williamsburg Bridge, with giant puppets, marionettes and shadow puppets. Out of the back of a moving truck in SOHO, with giant dinosaurs and BMXers flying off the walls.” [website] You can read an interview with Ian at The Nervous Breakdown.

Teenage Izzy Schappell-Spillman’s archive
Teenage is a film and a blog about youth culture. About the film: “Based on a groundbreaking book by the punk author Jon Savage, Teenage is an unconventional historical film about the invention of teenagers. Bringing to life fascinating youth from the early 20th century—from party-crazed Flappers and hipster Swing Kids to brainwashed Nazi Youth and frenzied Sub-Debs—the film reveals the pre-history of modern teenagers and the struggle between adults and adolescents to define youth.” [website] You can hear her perform the theme song for the teen site Rookie.

It’s Your World–If You Don’t Like It, Change It: Activism for Teenagers by Mikki Halpin
“Free Speech. Racism. The Environment. Gay Rights. Bullying and School Safety. Animal Welfare. War. Information about Safe Sex and Birth Control. Free Speech. HIV and AIDS. Women’s Rights. These are the issues you care about — and now you can do something about them. It’s Your World will show you how to act on your beliefs, no matter what they are, and make a difference.” [via IndieBound]

What are some of your favorite DIY projects? Comments are open.

Written by Gabrielle

January 5, 2012 at 5:52 am

On the Shelf: My New York Diary by Julie Doucet

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Grabbing the copy of the 1991 graphic novel My New York Diary as it sat on the St. Marks Bookshop discount shelf was a no-brainer. This slim comic by Canadian-born artist Julie Doucet, reissued in 2010 after being out of print, appealed to my younger, angstier self, the one who coveted zines and a punk rock ethos.

My New York Diary is made up of three autobiographical stories. The first is the awkward loss of her virginity—a cringe-worthy event involving a near-homeless, possibly inappropriately older man. The second is of her time at junior college studying fine art where she lives with a conspiracy theorist and attracts unstable men, one of whom attempts suicide in her room the night before her final project is due. The third, and meatiest, is the story of when she left her native Montreal for New York City. In the spring of 1991 she moved into the Washington Heights apartment of her pen pal, a guy who had become her boyfriend after one visit the month prior.

Following the book’s leitmotif, the guy turns out to be a bit unhinged, controlling her friendships, feeding her drugs, and distracting her from cartooning with games of Candy Land and bottles of alcohol.

Doucet first published her mini-comic Dirty Plotte by way of a Xerox machine but her year in New York coincides with the time she spent working on a book for Drawn and Quarterly, an independent comic book publisher in Canada. Her style is dark and detailed with thin lines, cross-hatching, shadowing, and other textural techniques. Her characters look ragged, half-starved, and drug-addled, which might have more to do with the company she kept rather than the manner in which she chooses to draw. Throughout the book she’s surrounded by depressed, struggling artist types who work odd jobs, if at all, and drink and take drugs to excess. No one appears to have enough money for a vacuum cleaner— including Doucet herself.

From a quick glance, it wouldn’t surprise anyone to hear that she was published in Robert Crumb’s magazine Weirdo. This inclusion in a 1981 issue earned her critical attention and future offers from The Village Voice and New York Press.

Having grown up in Montreal, English is not Julie’s first language and it shows in the writing for My New York Diary. There are minor grammatical errors and sometimes strange language usage, however it’s never confusing and only adds to the quirkiness of the book and the artist.

In bitch magazine, once co-editor and publisher of Punk Planet and current-day media activist, Anne Elizabeth Moore, said of Doucet’s work, “if I really think about something I read that made me gack with identification—that spoke to me in a pretty deep way about being a girl in the kind of world I was living in—it would have to be Julie Doucet’s Dirty Plotte comic books.” If you’re feeling particularly nostalgic for your DIY-loving days or are craving some unabashed, punk rock memoir writing, My New York Diary is for you.

::[Links]::
My New York Diary at IndieBound
Special edition with DVD
Julie Doucet’s website (in French)

On the Shelf: Here are a few things that will go well with My New York Diary:

13 Songs by Fugazi (1989)
One of the greatest punk (or “post-hardcore”) albums ever. Here’s an interview with lead singer, Ian MacKaye, in Pitchfork about the recent release of the band’s archives.

LP by Minor Threat
This was MacKaye’s first band before forming Fugazi. They’re mostly known for coining the term “straight edge”. This album is fast, loud, and angry. In short: awesome.

Despite Everything: A Cometbus Omnibus by Aaron “Cometbus”
In 1981, Aaron Cometbus, as he’s known, began this hand-written, photocopied zine in Berkeley, California. Most of his material is about living in punk houses, touring with bands, and living on the bare minimum with emotionally unstable friends. He’s still writing and co-owns an independent bookstore in Brooklyn.

BUST magazine founded by Debbie Stoller, Laurie Henzel, and Marcell Karp
BUST began in 1993 as a photocopied zine. I know because as an intern in the 90s I had to scan the early copies so they could be archived online. It’s a women’s magazine for indie-minded women: women who give the finger to convention but wear makeup and dresses, women who know how to change the oil in their car but who can also knit a mean scarf. Still going strong, and in a bi-monthly glossy format, BUST is core reading material for women who think Vogue cover stories could just as easily be written for The Onion.

Feminism is for Everybody by bell hooks
“In this engaging and provocative volume, bell hooks introduces a popular theory of feminism rooted in common sense and the wisdom of experience. Hers is a vision of a beloved community that appeals to all those committed to equality, mutual respect, and justice.

hooks applies her critical analysis to the most contentious and challenging issues facing feminists today, including reproductive rights, violence, race, class, and work. With her customary insight and unsparing honesty, hooks calls for a feminism free from divisive barriers but rich with rigorous debate. In language both eye-opening and optimistic, hooks encourages us to demand alternatives to patriarchal, racist, and homophobic culture, and to imagine a different future.” [ via IndieBound]

Gardenburger Veggie Medley burger
“A farmers’ market blend of delicious vegetables and grains with broccoli, rolled oats, savory onions, red and yellow bell peppers, crisp carrots, brown rice, and water chesnuts.” Gardenburger is my favorite veggie burger maker. They use the least number of processed ingredients and their patties are never dry—even when you toss them in the oven. You really can’t go wrong with any of the different varieties but I usually grab the straight-forward Veggie Medley.

Written by Gabrielle

December 30, 2011 at 6:08 am

Season’s Greetings from Literary New York

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2011 has been a great year for New York area booknerds. There are a number of thriving independent bookstores in Manhattan and Brooklyn, each with their own personality, staffed by fun, passionate readers who truly enjoy engaging with customers.

Anyone who takes a quick glance at my events page knows that during any given week there are a number of incredible author readings and launch parties vying for one’s attention. It’s a constant struggle to decide to how spend the night. There are series highlighting independent presses, literary journal parties, and authors in conversation with journalists, editors, and agents.

What follows here are the voices of just a few of the many, many hardworking people in the local community who have made this year unimaginably enjoyable and intellectually stimulating. Looking forward to the upcoming holidays, they’ve each thought of someone they’d gift a book to, said what that book would be and why; and then, because book people are impossible to buy books for, they’ve mentioned something book related they would like to get.

I hope you check out their bios and see what each of them are up to. Even if you don’t live in the area, I know that in this age of social media, you’ll benefit from their tireless creativity. Thanks to all of them and so many others.

And now, in no particular order (except for in which they were received):

Mark Asch is an editor at The L Magazine, in Brooklyn. You can follow them on Twitter at @TheLMagazine.

Who would you buy a book for? What would it be and why?
I would like to buy my 17-year-old self Jane Eyre, which I finally read this year; whenever I get around to belatedly loving a received classic I start to resent myself and my education for not getting it into my life sooner, which seems unhealthy but there you go.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
Accessorize it! with: wooden wine crates, which are great to fill with the books that start piling up on your floor once you run out of shelf space.

*****

Ron Hogan helped create the literary Internet by launching Beatrice.com in 1995. He is the author of Getting Right with Tao and The Stewardess Is Flying the Plane, and has contributed to several anthologies, including the New York Times bestseller Not Quite What I Was Planning, Forgotten Borough: Writers Come to Terms with Queens, and Secrets of the Lost Symbol. You can find him on Twitter at @RonHogan

Who would you buy a book for?
I think books are a perfect gift for just about anybody, once you know them well enough to have some idea of what they already have.

What book would it be? Why?
This year, I’ve been eyeballing Ruhlman’s Twenty, the new cookbook from Michael Ruhlman, as a potential gift for at least two or three foodies on my holiday list. Heck, I’ve been considering letting people know I might want it.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
I could really go for an Eames Lounge and Ottoman set, which would instantly become my default reading environment, but at nearly $4,000 BEFORE sales tax, I’m not holding my breath.

*****

Erica Barmash is the senior marketing manager at Harper Perennial. You can find her on twitter @ericabrooke and @HarperPerennial. She loves presents.

Who would you buy a book for?
My fiance, Tom

What would it be?
The Meatball Shop Cookbook

Why?
Last year for Valentine’s Day I gave Tom the Clinton St. Baking Company Cookbook, and he proceeded to make me chili, huevos rancheros, and grits that are just as good as the ones at the restaurant. I love The Meatball Shop and so does he, and I’m hoping we can repeat that pattern. His meatballs are already amazing, but with this book he’ll be able to experiment.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
Finally, Out of Print Tees has made a v-neck tee for a book I love! I want this A Tree Grows in Brooklyn shirt

******

Max Fenton is online editor of the Believer magazine and runs community support for Readability.com. You can find him on Twitter at @maxfenton

Who would you buy a book for?
My smarter, more damaged friends.

What book would it be?
The Instructions” by Adam Levin

Why?
A fifth-grader may or may not be the messiah and definitely falls in love. At 1050 pages the comparisons to Infinite Jest are apt, but Levin succeeds on his own merits with this intense and remarkable novel.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
A better desk lamp. I learned in October that peripheral vision affects the degree of eyestrain when screen reading, so the tone of light around your screen should be about the same as the screen itself.

******

Jenn Northington is the the events manager for WORD, a bookstore in Brooklyn, co-founder of the Bookrageous podcast, and haunts the interwebs as jennIRL. You can find her on Twitter at @jennIRL

Who would you buy a book for?
I have a lot of nerdy friends (SURPRISE). They’re often hard to buy for, because they each inhabit a very particular nerd niche — some are more into sci-fi, some fantasy, some pop-culture, and you never know what they have and what they don’t. Tricky!

What book would it be?
If there’s one book that I want to give all of them this year it’s How to Speak Wookiee: A Manual for Intergalactic Communication.

Why?
Sound-bytes from Chewie, side by side with hilarious (and possibly inaccurate) translations (I mean, I don’t think they actually visit an art gallery to talk about postmodernism in the original trilogy at least, but I could be wrong) — you really cannot go wrong.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
I’m so glad you asked — I’ve been salivating over Moleskine’s USB Rechargeable Booklight. The design is gorgeous, as you might expect, and the use of an LED light is just ingenious.

******

Tobias Carroll lives and writes in Brooklyn, New York. His fiction has appeared in Joyland, THE2NDHAND, Metazen, Word Riot, and more. He can be found online at www.thescowl.org, and contributes regularly to Vol. 1 Brooklyn. You can find him on Twitter at @TobiasCarroll

Who would you buy a book for?
That friend or family member who appreciates both well-written fiction and a good political debate.

What book would it be?
The double feature of Vanessa Veselka’s Zazen and Justin Taylor’s The Gospel of Anarchy. Because, hey: why buy one book when you could buy two?

Why?
Veselka and Taylor each grapple with complex interpersonal relationships, examine esoteric left-of-center movements, and ultimately leave their readers — whether sympathetic or hostile to said movements — challenged. But the novels also contrast in distinctive ways. The Gospel of Anarchy is set in a very specific place, with roots in the Gainesville punk scene of a few years ago. Zazen‘s setting is an unnammed city in the very near future (or, alternately, in a slightly more nerve-wracking present). Taylor’s tone moves from the grittily realistic to the mystical; Veselka’s, from the satirical to the paranoid. And both are terrific novels that stay in your head long after you’ve turned the last page.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
Some sort of logic-defying bookshelves that can fit twice as many books as the ones currently in my apartment. We’re only a few years from the bold defiance of spatial laws in the name of bibliophilia, right?

******

Michele Filgate is Events Coordinator at McNally Jackson Books, and a freelance writer and critic. You can find her on Twitter: @readandbreathe

Who would you buy a book for?
My grandmother Mimo. One of my favorite stories to tell is how she was fired from her first job when she was a teenager because she was caught behind the clothing racks reading a book. Mimo was the person who turned me into a voracious reader. We used to go to the library sales and buy bags of books.

What book would it be?
I’m buying her a signed copy of A CHRISTMAS BLIZZARD by Garrison Keillor.

Why?
She’s a big fan and was excited to hear that he was signing at McNally Jackson.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
I REALLY want someone to buy me an Ideal Bookshelf painting by Jane Mount. I just found out about this artist via Emma Straub, and I think it’s the perfect gift!

******

David Gutowski is the writer behind the music and literature blog Largehearted Boy. He also hosts a monthly music and author reading series at WORD in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. You can follow him on Twitter at @largeheartedboy.

Who would you buy a book for?
The young or old fan of supernatural commercial fiction.

What book would it be?
Martin Millar’s Lonely Werewolf Girl and Curse of the Wolf Girl.

Why?
Martin Millar transcends the supernatural genre with his smart writing; multiple, credible plotlines; well-drawn characters; and healthy doses of pop culture references.

These supernatural novels will appeal to both adult and young adult readers, and just might be the perfect opportunity to sneak something literary into the reading of Twilight fans.

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
A gift certificate to my local indie bookstore.

*****

Penina Roth is the curator of the Franklin Park Reading Series in Crown Heights, Brooklyn and a freelance journalist. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, the New York Post, the Forward and other publications. You can find her on Twitter at @PeninaRoth

Who would you buy a book for? What would it be and why?
I’d like to give my pulp romance-reading friend – let’s call her Susie – a copy of Simon Van Booy’s latest novel, Everything Beautiful Began After (in fact, it’s sitting on a shelf in my living room but I keep forgetting to drop it off). I’d like to steer her away from Danielle Steele and Nora Roberts and into more literary reading material, and I think Van Booy’s lush and tender novel, with its gorgeous language and imagery, would appeal to her. The romantic triangle subject doesn’t interest me (I avoid love stories), but I appreciate how Van Booy uses Athens, a complex city of bustling streets and crumbling ruins, as a lens for his rootless protagonists’ shifting moods. The characters cycle through loneliness, love and heartbreak amidst stray dogs, menacing shadows, pink sunsets, gleaming white buildings and broken statues. And the striking language makes mundane life sound exotic: a flight attendant is described as “a mechanical swan, wrapped in blue cotton” and a small French village is seen as “an open mouth of crooked houses.”

Any book related accessories you’d love to get this year?
As far as book accessories, I’d be happy with a compact reading lamp that won’t fall off my tiny nightstand.

Who would you buy a book for? What would it be and why? And what book-related accessory would you like to get? Comments are open.

Written by Gabrielle

December 15, 2011 at 6:01 am

What to Watch: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold

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The unconventional documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, best known for his film Super Size Me, an account of what happens when you eat only McDonald’s for 30 days, explores the advertising industry in his latest production. The Greatest Movie Ever Sold, now available on DVD, is an inside look at the ubiquity of advertising today. Spurlock pulls back the curtain to expose how product placement makes its way onto our television screens, into our Hollywood films, and even onto the fields of our high school football games.

In a humorous, meta-twist Spurlock seeks to finance the project with ads, auctioning off screen time in exchange for start-up money. A camera crew follows him as he meets with potential investors, pitches the idea, and hashes out the contracts.

As companies step forward, some of them major corporations with images to protect, and make their demands, Morgan worries about his integrity; however, his concern has the feel of a clever charade, a playful way to include critical voices. Morgan meets with cultural commentators such as Noam Chomsky and Ralph Nader as well as successful film directors J.J. Abrams and Quentin Tarantino. In their interviews, the former discuss corporate power and its influence on the general public while the latter share their firsthand experience with advertising in the film industry.

Pom Wonderful, the pomegranate juice company, winds up paying the largest sum, 1 million dollars, and their name, as part of the deal, is placed on the marquee. In fact, the full movie title is “Pom Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold”. Their financial support also means that whenever Morgan is in a meeting, Pom’s pomegranate juice is on the table. Similarly, wherever other drinks are present, those other company’s logos are out of focus. There are even a few commercial breaks featuring Spurlock as the star. Jet Blue, another major backer, gets the special treatment with an interview taking place in one of their terminals.

As the advertising industry’s marketing departments mingle with science, their tactics are honed to perfection. Using manipulation, these companies are able to steer customers away from the competition and toward their product. Morgan visits a neuroscientist who scans his brain in an MRI machine while he watches advertisements featuring images meant to inspire fear, induce cravings, and rev up the hormones.

In his trip to Sao Paolo, Brazil, where public advertising has been banned, the audience is given a glimpse of urban life without a barrage of images, a stark contrast to the scenes shot in New York City and Los Angeles.

The Greatest Movie Ever Sold benefits from Spurlock’s wit and charm. As the New York Times says in their review, “Mr. Spurlock has Mr. [Michael] Moore’s prankster’s instincts, though not his sense of outrage.” It’s this lack of outrage that makes an otherwise damning movie downright amusing. No one comes out looking like a villain but viewing audiences will walk away better educated.

This film is perfect for those who appreciate sarcasm and those concerned with endless advertising in our lives—and everyone in between. The Greatest Movie Ever Sold shows that a lighthearted approach to a serious topic can be just as thought-provoking as a dogmatic one. After watching Spurlock’s on-screen antics, you’ll never miss those faced-out soda cans on your favorite prime time show again.

::[Links]::
The Greatest Story Ever Sold official website
Morgan Spurlock’s TED Talk for The Greatest Story Ever Sold
Morgan Spurlock on KCRW’s The Business
Morgan Spurlock on NPR’s Talk of the Nation
Morgan Spurlock on Funny or Die (opens with sound)
Interview with Morgan Spurlock at AdWeek
Rogert Ebert’s review
New York Times review
AdWeek dives deeper into the MRI

What’s On the Shelf?
The Hidden Persuaders by Vance Packard
“The Hidden Persuaders is Vance Packard’s pioneering and prescient work revealing how advertisers use psychological methods to tap into our unconscious desires in order to “persuade” us to buy the products they are selling.

A classic examination of how our thoughts and feelings are manipulated by business, media and politicians, The Hidden Persuaders was the first book to expose the hidden world of “motivation research,” the psychological technique that advertisers use to probe our minds in order to control our actions as consumers. Through analysis of products, political campaigns and television programs of the 1950s, Packard shows how the insidious manipulation practices that have come to dominate today’s corporate-driven world began.” [via IndieBound]

Consuming Kids: Protecting Our Children from the Onslaught of Marketing & Advertising by Susan Linn
“[P]rovides instead a measured, but ultimately devastating, critique of consumerism and American childhood.

Children influence some $600 billion in annual spending, and marketers, as Linn amply documents, will stop at nothing to harness this kiddie-consumer juggernaut. Of the head-shaking stats and anecdotes Linn supplies, perhaps the most repulsive is the “nag factor study,” which identified the parents most susceptible to ‘pester power,’ whose kids thus make the most profitable advertising targets.” [via Mother Jones]

Buyology: Truth and Lies About Why We Buy by Martin Lindstrom
In Buy-ology: Truth and Lies About Why We Buy, author and marketing guru Martin Lindstromtakes us on a behind the scenes look at what sells and why we are lambs to the slaughter when it comes to buying ‘stuff.’ . . .  Using one of the largest neuromarketing studies, Lindstrom attempts to look past what we say and figure out why we do what we do and how our brain responds to all of the incoming stimuli.” [via Interview with TreeHugger]

How We Decide by Jonah Lehrer
“Jonah Lehrer’s engaging new book, “How We Decide,” puts our decision-making skills under the microscope. . . . [Malcolm] Gladwell’s book [Blink] took an external vantage point on its subject, drawing largely on observations from psychology and sociology, [to study the boundary between reason and intuition] while Lehrer’s is an inside job, zooming in on the inner workings of the brain. We learn about the nucleus accumbens, spindle cells and the prefrontal cortex.” [via The New York Times] Watch Jonah discuss his book on Fora.tv (opens with sound).

No Logo by Naomi Klein
“Klein’s writing caught the wave of anti-globalization protests that swept across the planet a decade ago, beginning with the massive and violent demonstrations against the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle in November 1999. Almost immediately, wherever world leaders gathered—international economic conferences, G8 summits, trade negotiations—they would be met with street protests and a parallel meeting of the planet’s angry marginalia, including counterculturalists, environmentalists, socialists, labor organizations, and human rights activists. No Logo was quickly adopted as the movement’s bible and, along with Nalgene water bottles and khaki cargo pants, became an essential part of the general-issue battle kit for campus lefties.

What are we to make of No Logo a decade on? It remains a passionate and ambitious snapshot of the newly globalized youth and consumer culture at the end of the 20th century. It is also an often infuriating work of agitprop that marries old Marxist prejudices about the market economy to a paranoid and conspiratorial account of the business of advertising.” [via Reason]

Written by Gabrielle

December 9, 2011 at 5:54 am

What to Watch: Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of A Tribe Called Quest

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Since A Tribe Called Quest’s second album, Low End Theory, came out in 1991 I’ve been a fan. I can still remember the first time I saw the video for “Scenario”. The lines were clever—like Phife Dog’s of-the-moment opener, “Bo knows this and Bo knows that But Bo don’t know jack, cause Bo can’t rap”—and Busta Rhymes’ mesmerizing cameo. That year “Scenario” was on everyone’s mixtape. If you were in a car or at a party for more than 10 minutes, chances are you’d hear it.

Delving deeper, as fanatical teens are known to do, I liked them more and more. I loved their jazz samples and smart lyrics and stuck with them throughout the years, faithfully buying each album.

Earlier this year when I’d heard Michael Rapaport made a documentary about the group, I thought I’d heard wrong. Michael Rapaport? A Tribe Called Quest? Truly it was too awesome a pairing to be real.

For anyone who doesn’t know who Michael Rapaport is, he was usually the only white actor in 90s “black” movies, or “Hood films” as Wikipedia calls them, who wasn’t casted as a cop or corrupt politician. It was the era of Spike Lee and films like New Jack City, Boyz N the Hood, Above the Rim, and Menace II Society were huge; Rapaport was consistently authentic—he was the down white guy.

Beats, Rhymes & Life was Rapaport’s first time directing a film, a project that came about unintentionally. In passing, he’d mentioned to Q-Tip that someone needed to make a film about them. Q-Tip said, “do it”.

The first scene Michael shot became the film’s opening; the group was on their 2008 reunion tour. The footage shows the height of the group’s tension. Tribe had broken up in 1998, after their album The Love Movement was released. They’d known each other for nearly 30 years and spent 20 of those making music.

Q-Tip, Phife Dog, and Ali Shaheed Muhammad were feeling the strain of living life as one entity. The film, however, is not about the group’s decline. Beats, Rhymes & Life doesn’t sensationalize the hard times, instead it’s a celebration of who this group was and what they meant to people.

When Rapaport looks back on Tribe’s early and glory days, he’s documenting the beginning—and rise—of hip hop, the revolution of the 80s, sparked by the radio. There were boomboxes on every stoop blasting DJ Red Alert, Run DMC, and LL Cool J—all influencers on Tribe’s style.

As Tribe’s sound became known on the street, in the venues, and on the radio, they, too, became the influential. Angie Martinez, Monie Love, the Beastie Boys, Common, Black Thought, and others all get on camera to tell stories and talk about what Tribe was to them. It made me remember how much fun East Coast hip hop was in the 90s.

In his interview with the New York Times, when asked if he thought it would be difficult to make a documentary about Tribe, Rapaport said, “Honestly, no. I was a little bit innocent about that,” which is exactly why he was the best man to shoot this film. Like Rapaport, A Tribe Called Quest always had an air of honesty and innocence. The group’s issues—largely isolated to Phife feelings towards Q-Tip, as the film shows—plays it out as a brotherly tiff, a misunderstanding between stubborn family members. Beats, Rhymes & Life is a trip down memory lane paved with love and affection.

::[Links]::
Official website
Q&A with the New York Times
Q&A with PBS’s Art Beat
Q&A with WNYC’s Culture Editor
Interview on Sound of Young America
Interview on KCRW’s The Treatment
Interview on NPR’s All Things Considered
Interview on WNYC’s Soundcheck
New York Times review
A.V. Club review

What’s on the Shelf?

The Plot Against Hip Hop by Nelson George
“THE PLOT AGAINST HIP HOP is a noir novel set in the world of hip hop culture. The stabbing murder of esteemed music critic Dwayne Robinson in a Soho office building is dismissed by the NYPD as a gang initiation. But his old friend, bodyguard/security expert D Hunter, suspects there’s much more to his death. An old cassette tape, the theft of a manuscript Robinson was working on, and some veiled threats suggest there are larger forces at work.” [via Akashic] Review in Time Out New York. Interview at okayplayer.

Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip Hop Generation by Jeff Chang
“On the surface, Can’t Stop charts a smart history of the hip-hop movement as it’s come to be understood; Chang devotes a lot of attention to breakdancing and graffiti, as well as the music. Can’t Stop‘s real strength, however, derives from its big-picture vantage. Chang is a formidable reporter who follows individual actions to their collective vanishing point, such that principal figures like Kool Herc, Afrika Bambaataa, Rakim, Public Enemy, and Ice Cube all wade in the lapping tides of black consciousness and political unrest. Chang’s approach to history seems to stem from a question he poses in regard to dub, the remixed reggae sound whose focus on shadows helped set the stage for hip-hop: ‘What kind of mirror is it that reflects everything but the person looking into it?'” [via The AV Club]

The Big Payback: The History of the Business of Hip Hop by Dan Charnas
“Pulitzer-level reporting — Charnas interviewed more than 300 subjects — brings to life the story of the dollars behind the ballers in this absorbing account of hip-hop’s transformation from South Bronx cottage industry to multibillion-dollar global business.” [via Spin]
Interview on Fresh Air. Interview on Sound of Young America. Interview at Fader.

Decoded by Jay-Z
“. . . ‘Decoded’ is much better than it needs to be; in fact, it’s one of a handful of books that just about any hip-hop fan should own. Jay-Z explains not only what his lyrics mean but how they sound, even how they feel . . .” [via New Yorker]
Interview on Fresh Air. Video of Jay-Z in conversation with Cornell West at the New York Public Library (opens with sound).

Def Jam Recordings: The First 25 Years of the Last Great Record Label by Bill Adler, Dan Charnas, and Rick Rubin; Introduction by Russell Simmons

Def Jam Recordings: The First 25 Years of the Last Great Record Label is a colossal read, with its oversize width reminiscent of a vinyl sleeve. But the inside isn’t daunting; in fact, it’s alluring, with photography steeped in the record company’s storied first years, alongside words from some of hip-hop’s historic moguls, such as Russell Simmons, Rick Rubin and Kevin Liles. With a relentless attention to aesthetic, Def Jam pays homage to both its past as a corporation and the past of the genre that it helped build.” [via The Root] Listen to Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons on NPR’s Weekend Edition.

What’s on your shelf this week? Comments are open. 

Written by Gabrielle

November 29, 2011 at 6:05 am

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